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Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 30 2010

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

Using Social Media in Your Job Search – Confidentially

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 30 2010

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U.S. Dept. Of Labor Says 70% Of Job Openings Are Not Posted Outside Company Walls

FIND EMPLOYERS IN YOUR REGION & SPECIALTY

Don't Wait For A Web Job Posting

REACH OUT ... GET HIRED!

Click Here For Details

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Using Social Media in Your Job Search

... Confidentially

Posted By: Jessica Holbrook On: 10/27/2010 9:59:50 AM In: Job Seeker - Resume

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USING SOCIAL MEDIA CONFIDENTIALLY

We often work with people who are still employed but who have seen the writing on the wall for the future of their companies. They seek us out to proactively start their job search process before they find themselves in a desperate situation. Many who are currently employed are nervous about sending any signals that they are seeking new opportunities. So what can you do to keep your job search confidential while using social media?

LinkedIn

LinkedIn offers many helpful ways to prevent your current coworkers from suspecting that you’re looking for a job. For instance, when you join groups on LinkedIn, you can choose to not have those groups displayed on your profile. You can also set your privacy settings so that people can’t tell when you’ve looked at their profiles—although the tradeoff is that this will disable your ability to know who’s looking at you. Lastly, you can choose to not have your news feed publicly displayed, so it won’t be obvious that you’re adding new colleagues or connections.

Facebook

If you keep your personal Facebook account and your professional contacts separate, Facebook becomes a very easy place to seek out information related to new career opportunities. Many companies and organizations have Facebook pages that you can “like” to get more information about the company. Some even have a “We’re Hiring” tab with job opportunities posted right on their page. Facebook is also a great place to get in touch with old school friends or neighbors who may not be professional contacts on LinkedIn, but who might have a great way to help you land your next job.

Twitter

Twitter is a great place to get yourself noticed as a voice in your field. If you’re looking to stay in your current field, posting articles or other content related to your work on a Twitter account shouldn’t raise any eyebrows among your colleagues. If you’re looking to change industries into something where you have a personal interest, no one can really question your tweeting about your hobbies and interests. The good news is that other people in whatever field interests you can come across your tweets, start following you, and build an online relationship based on your common interests.

If you become savvy with social media display and privacy controls, these sites can offer you a fantastic opportunity to put yourself out there as a passive candidate. Just make sure you’re updating these sites on your own time, so no one can accuse you of wasting company resources.

Recent studies show that 70-80% of people are not leveraging LinkedIn efficiently. Are you one of those job seekers who are getting lost in the shuffle? The fact of the matter is, if you don’t have a noticeable online presence you do not exist for some hiring authorities. If you’re in a job search it’s time to invest in professional LinkedIn profile development and start getting noticed.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

JOBNEWSRADIO.COM - CLERICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CHANNEL JOB SEARCH REPORT OCT-2010

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 11 2010

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JobNewsRADIO.com Job Search Resources

Clerical & Administrative Channel

JOB SEARCH REPORT OCT-2010

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Review Trends

Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Clerical & Administrative sector. The graphs represent the change in volume of Clerical & Administrative job and resume postings within the last several months.

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JOB TITLES IN THIS SECTOR INCLUDE ...

(see details on each below)

Accounting Clerk

Adjustment clerk

Answering Service Operator

Auditing Clerk

Bill & Account Collector

Billing, Cost or Rate Clerk

Billing, Posting or Calculating Machine Operator

Bookkeeping Clerk

Brokerage Clerk

Central Office Operator

Communication Equipment Operator

Correspondence Clerk

Court Clerk

Credit Authorizer

Credit Checker

Directory Assistance Operator

Executive Secretary

File Clerk

Gaming Cage Worker

Information & Record Clerk

Information Clerk

Legal Secretary

License Clerk

Loan Interviewer

Mail Clerk

Mail Machine Operator

Marking Clerk

Medical Secretary

Municipal Clerk

New Accounts Clerk

Office Clerk

Order Clerk

Order Filler

Payroll & Timekeeping Clerk

Postal Service Clerk

Postal Service Mail Carrier

Postal Service Mail Processor

Procurement clerk

Receptionist

Secretary

Statement Clerk

Stock Clerk

Switchboard Operator

Teller

Warehouse Clerk

Word Processor or Typist

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.Clerical Jobs & Administrative Jobs

Research Personality Types

Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles. What is your personality type?

Take our Free Personality Test Order the Complete Package

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The top three personality types in the Clerical & Administrative field are ISFJ, ISTJ, and INFJ.

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ISFJ(Introvert, Sensor, Feeler, Judger)

Clerical Jobs & Administrative Jobs

People of this type tend to be: cautious, gentle, and thoughtful; hesitant until they know people well then affectionate and caring; very literal and aware of the physical world; uncompromising about personal standards and easily offended; diligent and conscientious, organized and decisive. The most important thing to ISFJs is living a stable, predictable life and helping people in real ways.

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Clerical and Administrative

Job Keyword Searches

Below is a short list of the top search engine keywords used by Clerical job and Administrative job seekers to find valuable job opening resources. Please review the list below.

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1. Administrative Assistant

2. Clerical

3. Receptionist

4. Data Entry

5. Secretary

6. Executive Assistant

7. Clerk

8. Work from Home

9. Office Manager

10. Administration

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CLERK JOBS - CLERICAL JOBS - ADMINISTRATIVE JOBS

Job Descriptions

What Clerical & Administrative career suits you best? Below is just one career to consider. If it's not for you, consider researching many more career posibilities in Clerical & Administrative.

Correspondence Clerks

Compose letters in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, incorrect billings, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and typing correspondence.

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View Schools

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There's no better way to advance your Clerical & Administrative career than to get that degree. Check out schools that have programs in the Clerical & Administrative fields below or use our

FREE School Finder ... to find the right school for you.

Clerk, Clerical and Administrative Jobs CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Administrative Assistant

Business Administration

Business Applications

Medical Billing and Coding

All Clerical & Administrative Programs

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Jobs in Clerical / Administrative

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If you are looking for some information about a specific type of job or are just curious about other career paths, review the following positions to help choose the right one for you.

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Bill and Account Collectors

Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or service disconnection; keeping records of collection and status of accounts.

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Billing and Posting Clerks and Machine Operators

Compile, compute, and record billing, accounting, statistical, and other numerical data for billing purposes. Prepare billing invoices for services rendered or for delivery or shipment of goods.

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Brokerage Clerks

Perform clerical duties involving the purchase or sale of securities. Duties include writing orders for stock purchases and sales, computing transfer taxes, verifying stock transactions, accepting and delivering securities, tracking stock price fluctuations, computing equity, distributing dividends, and keeping records of daily transactions and holdings.

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Correspondence Clerks

Compose letters in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, incorrect billings, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and typing correspondence.

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Court, Municipal, and License Clerks

Perform clerical duties in courts of law, municipalities, and governmental licensing agencies and bureaus. May prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges and court; prepare draft agendas or bylaws for town or city council; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; issue licenses or permits; record data, administer tests, or collect fees.

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Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks

Authorize credit charges against customers' accounts. Investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit. May interview applicants to obtain personal and financial data; determine credit worthiness; process applications; and notify customers of acceptance or rejection of credit.

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Customer Service Representatives

Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle and resolve complaints.

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Data Entry Keyers

Operate data entry device, such as keyboard or photo composing perforator. Duties may include verifying data and preparing materials for printing.

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Desktop Publishers

Format typescript and graphic elements using computer software to produce publication-ready material.

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Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs

Determine eligibility of persons applying to receive assistance from government programs and agency resources, such as welfare, unemployment benefits, social security, and public housing.

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Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants

Provide high-level administrative support by conducting research, preparing statistical reports, handling information requests, and performing clerical functions such as preparing correspondence, receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, and scheduling meetings. May also train and supervise lower-level clerical staff.

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File Clerks

File correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.

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First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers

Supervise and coordinate the activities of clerical and administrative support workers.

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Loan Interviewers and Clerks

Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness, and complete transactions between loan establishment, borrowers, and sellers upon approval of loan.

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Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service

Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Use hand or mail handling machines to time stamp, open, read, sort, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, stamp, fold, stuff, and affix postage to outgoing mail or packages. Duties may also include keeping necessary records and completed forms.

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New Accounts Clerks

Interview persons desiring to open bank accounts. Explain banking services available to prospective customers and assist them in preparing application form.

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Office Clerks, General

Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.

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Office Machine Operators, Except Computer

Operate one or more of a variety of office machines, such as photocopying, photographic, and duplicating machines, or other office machines.

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Order Clerks

Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, classified ads, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, shipping dates, and delays; preparing contracts; and handling complaints.

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Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks

Compile and post employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions. May prepare paychecks.

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Procurement Clerks

Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.

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Proofreaders and Copy Markers

Read transcript or proof type setup to detect and mark for correction any grammatical, typographical, or compositional errors.

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Reservation and Transportation Ticket Agents and Travel Clerks

Make and confirm reservations and sell tickets to passengers for large hotel or motel chains. May check baggage and direct passengers to designated concourse, pier, or track; make reservations, deliver tickets, arrange for visas, contact individuals and groups to inform them of package tours, or provide tourists with travel information, such as points of interest, restaurants, rates, and emergency service.

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Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive

Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers.

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Statistical Assistants

Compile and compute data according to statistical formulas for use in statistical studies. May perform actuarial computations and compile charts and graphs for use by actuaries. Includes actuarial clerks.

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Stock Clerks and Order Fillers

Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise, materials, equipment, and other items from stockroom, warehouse, or storage yard to fill shelves, racks, tables, or customers' orders. May mark prices on merchandise and set up sales displays.

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Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service

Operate telephone business systems equipment or switchboards to relay incoming, outgoing, and interoffice calls. May supply information to callers and record messages.

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Telephone Operators

Provide information by accessing alphabetical and geographical directories. Assist customers with special billing requests, such as charges to a third party and credits or refunds for incorrectly dialed numbers or bad connections. May handle emergency calls and assist children or people with physical disabilities to make telephone calls.

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Word Processors and Typists

Use word processor/computer or typewriter to type letters, reports, forms, or other material from rough draft, corrected copy, or voice recording. May perform other clerical duties as assigned.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

MONSTER - HIRING INDEX UP 16% ANNUAL GROWTH RATE

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 07 2010

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Monster Employment Index

Sees 16% Year-Over-Year Growth

EMPLOYMENT INDEX

September 2010 Index Highlights:

• All major metropolitan markets tracked by the Index exhibit positive annual growth

• Service related industries - health care and social assistance; and professional, scientific, and technical services rise in September

• Annual growth remains stable for manufacturing; and transportation and warehousing between August and September

NEW YORK, October 7, 2010 - The U.S. Monster Employment Index recorded its eighth consecutive month of positive year-over-year growth during September with a growth rate of 16 percent. This is an accelerated rate from the 12 percent in the previous month, but less than the peak of 21 percent seen during June and July. The Index rose two points (1 percent) in September as online job demand partially rebounded from the August levels.

The Monster Employment Index is a monthly gauge of U.S. online job demand based on a real-time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large representative selection of corporate career Web sites and job boards, including Monster.com®.

During September, online job availability rose in eight of the Index’s 20 industry sectors and in 10 of the 23 occupational categories monitored. Index results for the past 13 months are as follows:

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Sept. 10 Aug. 10 Ju1. 10 Jun. 10 May 10 Apr. 10

138 136 138 141 134 133

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Mar. 10 Feb. 10 Jan. 10 Dec. 09 Nov. 09 Oct. 09 Sept. 09

125 124 114 115 119 120 119

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“Although we have seen the growth rate slow a bit over the last two months, it is encouraging that the Index continues to show positive year-on-year growth during 2010. This is a clear sign that employers are recruiting in greater numbers than they were a year ago and bodes well for steady, but continued improvement in the U.S. labor market,” said Jesse Harriott, senior vice president and chief knowledge officer at Monster Worldwide.

Several Service Sectors Remain Strong on Monthly and Annual Basis; Accommodation and Food Services Records Slowdown in Annual Growth Rate

Online recruitment activity rose in eight and held steady in five of the 20 industries between August and September. Compared to year-ago levels, 19 industries are showing positive growth trends, with majority of the industries recording accelerated growth from August.

Several service related industries exhibited gains in September with professional, scientific, and technical services; and healthcare and social assistance both rising in the Index, recording high annual growth rates amongst the industries. Both, health care and social assistance; and transportation and warehousing recorded annual increases of 25 percent and 20 percent respectively. These are positive signs for both industries as their annual growth rate exceeds that of the overall index. Meanwhile, manufacturing (up 16 percent); saw annual growth rates remain more or less stable from the previous month.

In contrast, accommodation and food services remained one of the weaker sectors in the September Index from an annual perspective with year-over-year growth rate slightly slowing since August indicating some moderation in demand conditions.

Protective Service; and Military-Specific Occupations Register Largest Gains in September; Healthcare Support and Legal Show Strongest Year-Over-Year Growth

Overall online demand for workers rose in 10 and remained flat in four of the 23 occupational categories in September.

Among occupations, protective service and military-specific recorded the largest increases in online job availability on a monthly basis. Year-over-year sector demand trends remained strongest for healthcare support (up 31 percent) and legal (up 22 percent). Office and administrative support and healthcare support edged up between August and September as reflected by growth in the broader service-related industries. Within the more white-collar segment, the computer and mathematical (IT) occupational group also registered a rise in September.

In contrast, personal care and service; and food preparation and serving related occupations recorded a slowdown in annual growth rate as reflected by the slowdown in the larger accommodation and food services industry.

Online Job Availability Increases in Six U.S. Census Bureau Regions in September; North Dakota Records Highest Annual Growth amongst States

During September, online job availability expanded in six of the nine U.S. Census divisions between August and September. Long-term growth accelerated for Middle Atlantic, which is now the top growth region from an annual perspective. Despite improvement, annual growth remains most reserved in South Atlantic and East South Central.

Among the 50 states and the District, 36 registered increased online job opportunities in September. In contrast with previous months, the fastest annual growth rates were found in central U.S. New York, the fastest growth state in August year-over-year, slipped in the state rankings with a more moderate 21 percent annual growth rate in September. The District of Columbia was the only location in this segment of the Index with an annual decline.

Twenty Two of 28 Major U.S. Metro Markets Monitored By the Index Rise in September

Philadelphia exhibited a four point (7 percent) gain in September to lead all major metro markets in monthly growth. Although still muted relative to 2007, recruitment has expanded over the past 12 months for nearly all occupations in this market, most notably for white collar occupations like life, physical, and social sciences; legal; management and healthcare practitioners. Meanwhile, Chicago registered improvement in online recruitment trends similar to Philadelphia, with the inclusion of Computer and mathematical; and education, training, and library among the white-collar occupational groups.

The Washington DC market exhibited the most moderate annual growth among the major metros in the Index. Among occupations, demand has gradually emerged over the year for management; architecture and engineering; the sciences; and arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media.

To obtain a full copy of the Monster Employment Index report for September 2010, and to access current individual data charts for each of the 28 metro markets tracked, please visit http://about-monster.com/employment-index. Data for the month of September 2010 will be released on November 4, 2010.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

OCTOBER CUSTOMER SERVICE JOB HIRING TRENDS

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 04 2010

" JOB INTERVIEW JITTERS! "

HOW TO HANDLE

Get Nervous At Job Interviews?

LEARN PROVEN TECHNIQUES TO FEEL AT EASE

* How non-verbal cues help you

* Listening & Responding

* Secrets of preparation

And Many More Great Tips From Pros

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CUSTOMER SERVICE JOBS - Industry Category Hiring Trends

CUSTOMER SERVICE JOBS

Customer Service career suit you best? Below are just a few careers to consider.

Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle and resolve complaints, and much more:

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Collections Agent

Customer Service Manager

Customer Service Representative

Customer Service Supervisor

Facilities Manager

Sales Assistant

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Review Trends

Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Customer Service sector. The graphs represent the change in volume of Customer Service job and resume postings within the last several months.

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CUSTOMER SERVICE JOBS

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Research Personality Types

Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles.

The top three personality types in the Customer Service field are ISFJ, ISTJ, and INTJ.

ISFJ(Introvert, Sensor, Feeler, Judger)

CUSTOMER SERVICE JOBS

People of this type tend to be: cautious, gentle, and thoughtful; hesitant until they know people well then affectionate and caring; very literal and aware of the physical world; uncompromising about personal standards and easily offended; diligent and conscientious, organized and decisive. The most important thing to ISFJs is living a stable, predictable life and helping people in real ways.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

Grace Under Fire - The Interview Answer

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Oct 04 2010

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JOB INTERVIEW MASTERY

WHERE TO FIND JOB INTERVIEW HELP

How to Set, Prepare for & Follow-Up A Job Interview

* What to say to set job interviews

* How to ask for a job offer

* How to reduce "Job Interview Jitters"

* 5 Best Job Interview "PREP" Tips & More ...

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

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Grace Under Fire - The Job Interview

Grace Under Fire - The Interview Answer

By Chet Baker

(Source: JobDig.com)

The art of interviewing is not an art. The art of interviewing is not theatre.

Interviewing is communication, pure and simple. Good interviewers are those who come before the candidate as themselves, determined to exchange meaningful ideas through questioning and answering. The best candidates are those who simply come as themselves, armed with honesty and integrity. Anything less than straight-forward is Hollywood, TV, playtime. It’s a game that each side can play where one side will win and the other will lose. Unfortunately the one that wins under less than forthright communication will most likely lose in the long run. Here’s why.

Winning a job by lying, cheating, or pretending cannot last or be fruitful for very long. A slick candidate who becomes something s/he isn’t and uses contrived skills to land the job, will eventually be discovered and either be dismissed because of an inability to perform to the standards required in the job description; or worse yet, pass time at a job s/he doesn’t fit into and is then ensconced in a dead-end job for him/her for who knows how long.

There, that said, let’s keep in mind that being yourself is the very most important concept you should remember to win the job. “BE YOURSELF”is the single most feature to practice.

Here’s the rub. As you approach your interview, the notion of “BEING YOURSELF” takes courage. To stand by your principles. But ironically, if you have courage, you are a principled person and the following suggestions will be easier than not. When a principled candidate, lathered in honesty, and bequeathed with passion for doing a good job steps into the crucible of the interview s/he will be less likely hindered by bone-chilling anxiety or panic-stricken fear of what might be thrown at them. Principled people are likely to be self-confident and poised. The next most important 2 concepts of winning a job.

SELF-CONFIDENCE – comes from being prepared. If the job you are seeking and being interviewed for is high on your list, for gawd sakes know the company and know who is interviewing you. Research, research, research. (Ticker Symbol, Annual Revenues, Product Mix, Target Market) When faced with those seemingly difficult questions that there is no right answer for hits you between the eyes, you will be much more capable of crafting an answer that makes sense if you are prepared with knowledge. Being prepared breeds SELF-CONFIDENCE. Self confidence breeds poise.

POISE – is how easily someone performs under fire. Poise is being gracious. Often referred to as “GRACE UNDER PRESSURE,” poise is viewing situations positively. Poise is knowing how to present yourself: eloquent speech patterns, body in control, inspiring those around you. Poise is leadership. Poise attracts admiration. Poise overcomes words. Did you know that of all the communication performed during an interview by a candidate, the most important is how they say things, NOT what they necessarily say.

The tone, the inflections, the self-confidence and yes it’s the poise of the delivery. So after speaking of the embedded skills in “Being Yourself”: self-confidence and poise, the bedrock characteristics that can’t be contrived nor relinquished, the list of do’s and don’t are secondary. Important yes, such as: building rapport, listening, observing, what to bring, appropriate dress code, arriving 10 minutes early, speaking 50% of the time, having a list of prepared questions and being ready for the standard questions.

In closing, let me say, interviewing is the place to shine, at the desk of your prospective employer. Practice what counts. Sage advice exists from thousands of blogs, books, friends and consultants. Trying to prepare for an interview by looking and listening through all the tips and suggestions coming at you can be trying and elevate your stress level. And avoiding stress before the interview is essential.

Rather than getting tied into a knot with self-inspection overload and interview question memorization, I would spend the time researching the company, the person interviewing you as much as possible, drafting the appropriate questions based on your research. I would prepare for the given questions, sure to surface:

Tell me about yourself?

Why do you want this job?

Why are you right for this job?

And then with the time left I would have a chat with myself. Something like this:

“I deserve to be in this interview. I’ve earned the right to be there. I am good at what I do. I may not have all the schooling or credentials they are looking for, but what I’ve learned in my years of experience, they can’t teach in school.”

(The little blurb about not having all the schooling and credentials is simply because seldom does a candidates sit in front of the hiring manager and possess ALL the stuff they are looking for.)

In other words, convince yourself you are the absolute best choice for the job first. If you do that effectively, you will most likely convince them of the same.

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About Chet Baker

Company: Denver Résumé Builder

Website: http://www.denverresumebuilder.com/

Chet is the founder and owner of the Denver Résumé Builder, a résumé writing service and job-search consultant. He is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW), with over 13 years of career management experience including independent executive recruiting and corporate recruiting. As a full-time professional writer, he develops profiles for his clients with sound-fundamental, principals that are proven and effective. Awarded The Chamber of Commerce Small-Businessman of The Year distinction. He has served at the pleasure of a Governor and is a graduate of the University of New Mexico. He is a member of Professional Association of Résumé Writers and Career Coaches and Colorado Career Development Association.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine