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Flirting in the Workplace

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 29 2010

SOURCE: Beyond.com

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Flirting in the Workplace

Some say office flirting is innocent and just a natural way to be nice to people and to enjoy the fun of being with others. However, what may be flirting to one person could be sexual harassment to another person. It’s a fine line and there are no universal laws about flirting in the workplace. Therefore, it is up to individuals to gauge what is appropriate and what is not and hopefully there is an office sexual harassment policy in place to help provide some guidance along the way.

To avoid overstepping boundaries in the workplace, here are a few simple tips employees should follow:

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• Observe other colleagues to discover the unspoken etiquette in your workplace.

• Limit public displays of affection.

• Treat everyone in the office the same way.

• Utilize group dynamics to avoid uncertainty.

• Maintain a wardrobe that projects a professional image.

• Strive to keep flattering remarks work-related rather than personal.

• Be aware of your office’s sexual harassment policy.

Reporting Bad Behavior

If an employee witnesses flirting or another situation in the workplace that they are uncomfortable with, it is best to speak up about it. One of the easiest ways to handle a situation is to discuss the matter directly with the involved colleagues. It is always best to approach them privately and let them know that their actions are not appropriate or appreciated. Explain why their behavior is disturbing or offensive and politely ask them to stop.

If the offended employee is not comfortable discussing the matter with the colleagues in person, they should take their complaint directly to their leader. It is best to document the situation and provide as much detail as possible. This approach is more complex, and therefore has harsher consequences, which often times involves getting the HR department involved to handle the situation. Usually the investigation ends with some form of discipline for the offending parties and could even result in dismissal from the company if the behavior continues. An office sexual harassment policy should include the necessary steps for reporting bad behavior.

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Preventative Measures Employers Can Take

It is important for companies to have a clear sexual harassment policy in place to help guide employees and allow them to make their best judgment. Employers should communicate this policy upon hiring each new employee and hold company meetings annually to reinforce the policy. Here are some steps companies should take into consideration regarding their sexual harassment policy:

•Research the law. Employers should consult their legal counsel to make sure that all state laws regarding sexual harassment are included in the policy.

•Inform employees about the policy. Once the policy is in writing, make sure all your employees know about it and make sure to review and update it from time to time.

•Educate employees. Offer sexual training seminars to further explain and reiterate the information in the sexual harassment policy. Allow employees to ask questions so they can better understand what is inappropriate and how to report it if a situation occurs.

•Follow the same rules. It is important that everyone follow the same rules, regardless of level or position in the company, otherwise the policy will not be taken seriously.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

FINDING GREAT SALES JOBS AND SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN A BAD ECONOMY

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 22 2010

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JobNewsRADIO.com

FINDING GREAT SALES JOBS AND SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN A BAD ECONOMY

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Sales Jobs &

Sales Management

Jobs - Recent Facts & Actions

USE THE INFORMATION BELOW TO HELP YOU FIND YOUR NEXT SALES JOB

OR SALES MANAGEMENT JOB

. SALES JOB HIRING REPORT

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Sales Keyword SALES JOB Searches

(Having a great set of proven, industry or vocation specific job search keywords can bring you valuable job resources you may otherwise never see; try adding your own city/state/region/job-title/etc. to the samples below)

1. Sales jobs

2. Sales Manager

3. Retail

4. Pharmaceutical

5. Pharmaceutical Sales

6. Cashier

7. Medical

8. Outside Sales

9. Software

10. Food

11. Inside Sales

12. Sales Representative

13. Account Manager

14. Demonstrator

15. Retail Sales

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Search HOT! Sales Job Hiring Trends ... Titles MOST HIRED Over The Last 90 Days

Advertising Sales Agent

Agricultural Sales Representative

Biotechnical Equipment Sales Representative

Cashier

Chemical Sales Representative

Computer Hardware Sales Representative

Counter Clerk

Demonstrator

Door-to-door Sales Worker

Financial Services Sales Agent

Food Service Sales Agent

Instrument Sales Representative

Insurance Sales Agent

Mechanical Equipment Sales Representative

Medical Sales Representative

Model

Non-retail Sales Supervisor

Parts Salesperson

Pharmaceutical Sales Representative

Product Promoter

Real Estate Sales Agent

Retail Sales Representative

Retail Sales Supervisor

Sales Engineer

Sales Manager

Software Sales Representative

Telecommunications Sales Agent

Telemarketer

Vendor

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Review Sales Job Sector Hiring Trends

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Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Sales sector.

The graphs represent the change in volume of Sales job and resume postings within the last several months.

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SALES JOB HIRING TRENDS

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Research About SALES JOB Personality Types Employers Hire Most

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Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles. What is your personality type?

The top three personality types in the Sales field are INTJ, INFJ, and ISTJ.

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INTJ (Introvert, Intuitive, Thinker, Judger)

SALES JOB HIRING SECRETS

People of this type tend to be: autonomous, aloof, and intellectual; imaginative, innovative, and unique; critical, analytical, and logical; intellectually curious, driven to learn and increase their competence and knowledge; socially cautious and reserved; organized and definitive. The most important thing to INTJs is their independence and being able to live according to their own standards.

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SALES JOB TITLES IN DEMAND AS COMPARED

TO 'Sales Job Sector Hiring Trends' Graph Above

Sales Job Descriptions

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Retail Salespersons

Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment.

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Jobs in Sales & Sales Management

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Advertising Sales Agents

Sell or solicit advertising, including graphic art, advertising space in publications, custom made signs, or TV and radio advertising time. May obtain leases for outdoor advertising sites or persuade retailer to use sales promotion display items.

Door-To-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers

Sell goods or services door-to-door or on the street.

Parts Salespersons

Sell spare and replacement parts and equipment in repair shop or parts store.

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Retail Salespersons

Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment.

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Sales Engineers

Sell business goods or services, the selling of which requires a technical background equivalent to a baccalaureate degree in engineering.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products

Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses or groups of individuals. Work requires substantial knowledge of items sold.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products

Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers where technical or scientific knowledge is required in such areas as biology, engineering, chemistry, and electronics, normally obtained from at least 2 years of post-secondary education.

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. FIND SALES JOBS OR SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN AREAS ACROSS THE USA

SALES JOB HIRING RESOURCES USA-WIDE

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WHERE TO FIND RELIABLE, COMPREHENSIVE, SALES JOB HIRING RESOURCES

WHERE TO FIND PROVEN SALES JOB SEARCH RESOURCES

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

4 LinkedIn Mistakes – Have You Made One?

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 22 2010

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JobNewsRADIO.com

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4 LinkedIn Mistakes –

Have You Made One?

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JOB SEARCH NETWORKING

ARE YOUR JOB SEARCH NETWORKING TIES GETTING TANGLED?

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Posted By: Jessica Holbrook In: Networking

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Aside from the basic rules of engagement ... LinkedIn has established, here are a few other courtesies to remember while making the most of your LinkedIn experience. Follow these points and you’ll be sure to get the most out of LinkedIn—and you’ll avoid aggravating other users in the process. Here are four mistakes to avoid while using LinkedIn:

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BLINDLY REQUESTING CONNECTIONS WITH NO MUTUAL BENEFIT

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On Facebook you can request new friendships with anybody at all. It’s a social network of friends, and if you want to be friends you simply make a request. With LinkedIn you’re making a ‘connection’ that will hopefully create a mutually beneficial networking opportunity later on down the line. Be strategic when deciding with whom you will connect, and explain to the person why you want to connect; what’s in it for them—and what’s it in for you? Don’t request to connect with just anyone at all; understandably, people will want to know why you are requesting the opportunity to connect. So provide a brief sentence or two explaining what you think a mutual connection can bring to both parties.

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NOT BEING TRUTHFUL ABOUT WHY YOU WANT TO CONNECT

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If it’s being brought up, it’s because people have done it. Others have complained about it. It’s hard sometimes to establish a connection with someone when LinkedIn only allows you certain ways to request connections. That being said, you should still be truthful in why you want to connect. If the purpose of networking is to create mutual connections that may help either party in the future, do you really want to start that connection with mistrust or deceit? The most frequent use of this is presenting yourself as a ‘friend’ of someone or ‘colleague at XYZ organization’ when you really are not. It’s not going to get you the connection, and in the end you’re going to be perceived as being dishonest—and who wants to connect or potentially help someone who isn’t honest?

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PROFILE CONTENT IS NOT A REPRODUCTION OF YOUR RESUME

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This mistake is so well ingrained in users that you’re now probably experiencing some disbelief. Don’t just copy and paste your resume into your LinkedIn profile. Here’s why: When you network with someone in person do you give them a word-for-word rundown from your resume of what you’ve done? No, you personalize the conversation and speak in the first person. It is a more casual conversation—not as formal as your resume. Your profile should be keyword-rich so that recruiters can find you if they’re performing a search, but it should also be authentic and sincere, as though you’re talking to the person about what you’ve accomplished.

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KEYWORDS ARE NOT JUST FOR RESUMES

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Recruiters and hiring managers are performing searches on LinkedIn for qualified candidates, and you want to be found. Why else would you be there? Seriously, make sure your LinkedIn profile is peppered with industry-specific keywords relevant to the target position you want. It should be called LISO (LinkedIn Search Optimization)—like SEO—but for LinkedIn. Keywords = Being Discovered = Interview = New Job. Get keywords now.

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To recap: Be sure you are honest, strategic, and explanatory in your LinkedIn connection requests; your profile isn’t just a copy of your resume; and that your profile is keyword-rich so people can find you! These four key tips will make the most of your LinkedIn experience and keep you ahead of the game.

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Source: http://jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/4-linkedin-mistakes-have-you-made-one-4641-article.html

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Why Am I Not Getting A Response From Employers? - ONE EXPERT'S OBSERVATIONS

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 11 2010

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JobNewsRADIO.com

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Why Am I Not Getting

A Response From Employers?

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How To Get Employers To Respond . WE NEED HELP ON THIS MATTER ...

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Posted By: Nimish Thakkar On: 11/4/2010 5:00:18 PM In: Job Seeker - Resume

http://jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/why-am-i-not-getting-a-response-from-employers-4954-article.html

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I have sent out dozens of resumes -- why am I not getting a response from employers? As resume writers and career coaches, we hear such questions very frequently. While the economy can be a major determining factor, the truth is that job seekers can take affirmative steps to improve response rates.

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I have sent out dozens of resumes -- why am I not getting a response from employers? As resume writers and career coaches, we hear such questions very frequently. While the economy can be a major determining factor, the truth is that job seekers can take affirmative steps to improve response rates.

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While many variables can impact the success of a job search campaign, four major factors merit consideration: background, resume, job search strategies, and aggressiveness of the campaign. Let’s review each of these in further detail.

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Background, focus, and resume revamp

Jim was a top-producing sales professional with a small business. During his stellar sales career, he had produced multi-million dollar sales growth and had won some very prestigious accounts (high net worth individuals). As successful as Jim was, he was very passionate about working as an account manager, but despite his sales accomplishments and relationship management skills, his resume was getting 0% response.

What was going wrong? Apparently, Jim had concocted a perception that sales and account management are interchangeable and he used his sales resume to target every possible account management opportunity under the sun. Hiring managers, on the other end, were seeing the connection and similarity between sales and account management but were more focused on applicants with a core account management background.

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Solution

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Jim’s case is representative of many job seekers who either don’t have the right background or have it buried deep within their resumes. After several coaching and resume writing sessions, Jim was ready for a major career makeover. With the help of his manager, he got involved in managing the accounts he had secured. In addition to this work experience, he also enrolled in training programs that were offered by external vendors and by his own company. Jim highlighted his account management accomplishments on the resume and after a complete resume revamp, the response rates improved dramatically. He is now on the road to success.

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If you have the right background, a well-written resume can make a big difference

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Jen was an accomplished market research analyst with over five years experience. She also held a graduate degree in marketing and was considered a promising candidate by most of her superiors. Jen’s background was working in her favor, but employers were not too keen on calling her. Why?

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Her resume did not showcase her strongest selling points. In addition to an old school resume writing style, her resume was focused mostly on her job duties and not her accomplishments. There was absolutely nothing on her resume that would WOW potential employers. There was simply not enough meat to position her.

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Solution

Complete resume makeover. Jen’s resume was rewritten from scratch to showcase her accomplishments and to brand and position her from the perspective of potential employers. Branding statements, accomplishments, powerful career stories, eye-catching summary, and a complete rewrite of her resume transformed her dull resume into a powerful marketing piece that landed her several interviews. Jen now works with a prestigious pharmaceutical company.

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Active as opposed to passive job searching

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Amy was applying for a project management position. Her resume was compelling and she did have the right background and credentials. Despite having ace credentials, Amy was unemployed for over six months. When her unemployment benefits were close to termination, she hit the panic button but was unable to unravel the mystery cause that was foiling her career aspirations. She was the perfect candidate, no doubt, but why wasn’t she able to generate interviews? Wrong job search strategies.

Solution

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In current economic conditions, it is very important to use a portfolio of job search strategies -- from job boards and classified ads to social media and networking, it is important to mobilize all the job search tools, just as if you were launching a marketing campaign for a product or service.

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Simply waiting for job leads to pour in is not going to work. Intense efforts must be made using a combination of job search strategies. Amy realized this and turned-around her job search efforts. In addition to posting her resume on job boards, she started networking aggressively and also focused on using a combination of several job search strategies, including cold calling employers and recruiters.

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In addition to her job search arsenal, Amy also increased the number of applications she was sending out. From applying to just a few jobs every day, she started applying to 20 to 30 active positions on a daily basis (in addition to networking). Within a few months, Amy was hired as a project manager.

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How did she find the position? She met her prospective employer during an Amtrak ride from New York to Connecticut.

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Good luck in your job search ...

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

7 ‘NO-BRAINER’ JOB SEARCH MISTAKES TOO MANY JOBSEEKERS MAKE

Posted by Mark Baber
Nov 09 2010

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7 ‘NO-BRAINER’ JOB SEARCH MISTAKES TOO MANY JOBSEEKERS MAKE

By Mark Baber - for JobNewsRADIO.com

Mistake-Check Your Job Search Plan

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Those jobseekers who do not read this article ... will very likely make one, or more, of the seven job search mistakes about to be mentioned in this missive, and it will cost them the job offers they were hoping to find. Guess what … so will most of the people who do read this job search article make some of the same mistakes; mistakes that will usually cool any warmed interest by an employer-of-choice.

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Why will both those who do-read and those who do-not-read this article have problems? Because the US Department of Labor reports (2008) that better than eighty-percent of jobseekers do not proof-read their resumes and other job search documents, once constructed. Any subsequent grammatical or spelling or format related issues are, thereby, passed on to prospective employers. Because of that, the DOL confirms roughly seventy-three-percent of all job applicants are screened from the hiring process due to poor resume content. There remains only some seven-percent, or so, of those job candidates with resume mistakes squeaking through to still be considered for job interviews. But, wait a minute … we’re discussing a ‘seven-percent’ job applicant talent-pool who do not realize their resumes carry serious mistakes. Will those mistakes come to haunt them later in the job interview?

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Once you see the full list of offending mistakes you will understand why these most obvious of rookie mistakes are easy to miss, even for individuals who tend towards good management of details. So my best advice to readers is the same advice I have for the job candidates I work with directly – check your job search skills against the list below, before you assume you have your own job search squared-away and well oiled for success.

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As an Executive Search specialist, I have seen a great many more job candidates toppled from the hiring process directly due to the seven mistakes below, as I have seen top job offers generated by individuals determined not to make any of those same seven job search mistakes. So, it’s not my intention to be harsh, or judgmental or condemning towards jobseekers’ abilities when I suggest they, as a whole, tend towards lapses of common-sense, as we all do from time-to-time. Try and mitigate fallout from such stumbles by heeding the observations below.

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SEVEN NO-BRAINER JOB SEARCH MISTAKES

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1. Arriving too late or way too early – no excuse will ever be good enough to explain such behavior. Save it.

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2. Bringing someone with you – anyone, for any reason, like children, or your mother, or a girl or boyfriend, or your lawyer, or accountant, or even a monkey – you read that right – a job applicant once brought a live monkey to a job interview, after the pet had received emergency treatment from a veterinarian and couldn’t be left alone; the monkey didn’t get the job either.

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3. Mistakes on your resume and other hiring documents – didn’t we cover this one above?

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4. Forgot your resume – or your job references, or your completed job application, or your job interview notes, etc.. What are you thinking? Is it in your other purse? Please don’t claim the dog ate it.

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5. Poor attitude – whatever the reason for any change in general good spirits – you just got robbed at gunpoint, a spat of bad news, your car was just towed or wrecked, just filed bankruptcy, divorce papers served on you, whatever - your sour demeanor will never brighten anyone’s day, and they will remember that about such job candidates.

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5. Fibbing – about skills or experience, shame on you, and don’t use the ‘little-white-lie’ defense ... ever. And expect that your shadowy escapades will be revealed – they always are, sooner or later. But worse than that, you’ll know the truth about yourself.

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6. Failure to research – job duties, required skills, specific workplace challenges the company hopes to manage by hiring for the job you want, the actual hiring process, and the person in authority to approve your job offer, etc. Otherwise, why bother to show up?

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7. Failure to ask for the job – if it’s a job you really like and want … who wouldn’t ask for it, right? Believe it or not, a full third of job candidates fail to express decided interest in pursuing a specific job they interview for, and want; awaiting the employer to take the lead in what happens next, or sometimes initiating some sort of cagey strategy of non-committal-ness till the candidate learns more about the job. Some of my employer clients have strict requirements about not hiring any applicant who cannot summon the wit to ask for a job. How hard is to say: “I like what I hear, how do we put this together?” Or words to that affect. I think for most who miss their opportunity to ‘ask for the job,’ it has to do with not realizing the employer’s expectations of pursuit; or, in some cases, the job candidate simply not knowing exactly what words to use, and before they can muster the phrasing to state their interest in the job, the job interview is over.

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While the seven job search mistakes reviewed in this article represent common, yet serious, issues job applicants should consider as they seek new employment, there are others. But start here, with this list. Mistake-check your expected job hunt results by comparing your efforts against the egregious list of ‘NO-BRAINER’ job search mistakes offered herein.

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And the best of luck to you in your job search.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

MONSTER.com OCTOBER EMPLOYMENT INDEX

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 04 2010

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MONSTER.com OCTOBER

EMPLOYMENT INDEX

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Year-Over-Year Growth Rate Continues to Remain Positive in October, According to Monster Employment Index

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Month-Over-Month Growth Eases 1% in October

October 2010 Index Highlights:

•Ninth consecutive month of positive annual growth rate - at 13 percent in October

•All major metropolitan markets tracked by the Index exhibit positive annual growth

•Trade-related industries – transportation and warehousing; wholesale trade; and retail trade – exhibit strong growth trends year-over-year

•Annual growth eases from September levels for health care and social assistance; and professional, scientific, and technical services

NEW YORK, November 4, 2010 - The U.S. Monster Employment Index annual growth rate continued to be positive with a 13 percent increase year-over-year, although at a slower rate compared to early summer. The Index dropped two points (1 percent) on a monthly basis, as online job demand continued to fluctuate within a two-point margin for the fourth consecutive month.

The Monster Employment Index is a monthly gauge of U.S. online job demand based on a real-time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large representative selection of corporate career Web sites and job boards, including Monster.com®.

During October, online job availability rose in 10 of the Index’s 20 industry sectors and in eight of the 23 occupational categories monitored. Index results for the past 13 months are as follows:

Oct. 10 Sept. 10 Aug. 10 Ju1. 10 Jun. 10 May 10 Apr. 10 Mar. 10 Feb. 10 Jan. 10 Dec. 09 Nov. 09 Oct. 09

136 138 136 138 141 134 133 125 124 114 115 119 120

“Despite the contraction in the annual growth rate, expansion continues in a sustained manner for several large industries and markets over the long term,” said Jesse Harriott, senior vice president and chief knowledge officer at Monster Worldwide. “Conditions also continue to be favorable across the country, with opportunities rising above the levels they were last year in all major metro markets monitored by the Index”.

Trade Related Sectors Record Strong Growth on Annual Basis, While Healthcare and Social Assistance Eases

OOnline recruitment activity rose in 10 and held steady in three of the 20 industries between September and October. Compared to year-ago levels, 17 industries are showing positive growth trends, with majority of the industries recording accelerated growth from September.

Online job demand rose for trade and related sectors with transportation and warehousing growing to its highest level this year and recording an accelerated growth rate of 27 percent in October compared to 20 percent in September. This increase coincides with the Department of Commerce’s latest data on import and export values, which continue to exhibit year-over-year gains. Online recruitment activity also expanded for the wholesale trade and retail trade sectors, with annual growth accelerating to 12 percent and 13 percent respectively. Apart from retail trade, consumer-driven sectors such as accommodation and food services; and arts, entertainment, and recreation were relatively stable over the longer term.

Meanwhile, in contrast to the general trend recorded this year, health care and social assistance edged down in October with the 12-month growth rate for the sector easing to 11 percent in October from 25 percent in September. However, the long-term trend still continues to remain positive aligning with payroll data that shows the sector expanding by more than 25,000 workers on a monthly basis so far in 2010. Professional, scientific, and technical services also eased on an annual basis at 18 percent in October from 20 percent in September.

Legal; and Transportation and Material Moving Occupations Register Largest Gains on Annual Basis in October

Overall online demand for workers rose in eight and remained flat in one of the 23 occupational categories in October.

Among occupations, year-over-year demand trends moved upward for legal and computer-related professionals, as exhibited by the annual growth in the broader information; and finance and insurance industries. Online job demand was relatively tempered for most other white-collar occupations.

In contrast, personal care and service; and food preparation and serving related occupations recorded a slowdown in annual growth rate as reflected by the slowdown in the larger accommodation and food services industry.

Online Job Availability Increases in One U.S. Census Bureau Region in October on Monthly Basis; Arizona Records Highest Annual Growth amongst States

During October, online job availability expanded in one of the nine U.S. Census divisions on a monthly basis. Long-term growth held steady at 18 percent for West North Central, which is now the top growth region from an annual perspective, while all others registered moderation in annual growth rates. Year-over-year change was mildest in South Atlantic.

Among the 50 states and the District, 16 registered increased online job opportunities in October. In line with September’s trends, the fastest annual growth rates continued to be recorded in central U.S.A. Among the most populous states, New York maintained a relatively rapid 17 percent annual growth pace in October. In contrast, the District of Columbia was the only location to register an annual decline.

Thirteen of 28 Major U.S. Metro Markets Monitored By the Index Rise Month-over-Month; All 28 Metro Markets Up Year-over-Year

Portland’s annual month growth rate accelerated to 32 percent, reflecting a substantial improvement in the long-term trend relative to previous months due to notable increase in demand for transportation and material moving; IT; arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media; and management occupations.

Boston registered the most substantial acceleration in long-term growth rate (30 percent year-over-year in October from 19 percent in September) due to notable improvement in annual growth rate for sales; office and administrative support; and legal occupations. Transportation and material moving; production, and most white-collar occupational categories outside of the sciences also exhibited relatively strong year-over-year growth in this market.

In contrast, Baltimore registered the largest slowdown in annual growth easing to 11 percent in October from 18 percent in September. Annual growth trends for white-collar occupations were relatively weak, apart from occupations related to life, physical and social sciences, and demand levels still remain well below their respective baselines.

To obtain a full copy of the Monster Employment Index report for October 2010, and to access current individual data charts for each of the 28 metro markets tracked, please visit http://about-monster.com/employment-index. Data for the month of Novembebr 2010 will be released on December 2, 2010.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

3 Ways to Quantify Your Experience with Numbers

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 03 2010

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3 Ways to Quantify Your Experience with Numbers

WHY QUANTIFY EXPERIENCE?

Posted By: Jessica Holbrook On: 10/19/2010 9:30:34 AM In: Job Seeker - Resume

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If you’ve been doing your homework about how to write an effective resume ..., you’ve seen a recurring theme: you have to quantify your experience. Although most people understand the general idea of this, I find that job seekers often struggle with applying this idea to writing their resumes. Here are 3 easy ways to do it:

Let’s Show How Many

Sometimes our responsibilities don’t sound that impressive until we start detailing how much work we’ve been doing. For instance, if one of your job responsibilities is tracking your company’s compliance with filing a set of forms every year, you could write that two different ways:

Ensured compliance with filing of annual forms. –or—

Ensured compliance with the filing of 75 annual forms by 7 different company departments.

Doesn’t the second example sound much more impressive?

Then Show How Much

If you have a job in sales, marketing, or any other business where profitability is the ultimate goal of your position, citing exactly how much money you’ve either made or saved your company is the way to go. For example, if you’re an internal auditor, your resume could say:

Saved company money by finding ways to cut costs. –or—

Implemented new payroll and tax accounting systems that saved firm $1M in personnel costs over the next 10 years.

Estimates are fine when citing these types of numbers, as long as you can justify your claim if someone asks you in an interview.

Last. Show How Often

I frequently talk with job seekers who have previously been successful in very high-volume environments. If you’ve worked in this type of setting, please give yourself credit! Even an administrative assistant’s job sounds completely different when given some context:

Answered phones at the front desk. –or—

Managed switchboard with 10 incoming lines, effectively receiving and routing an average of 500 calls per day.

My goodness, who wouldn’t hire the second candidate?

As you write your resume, ask yourself these three important questions: How many? How much? How often? The key to landing an interview is to answer those questions as you describe your previous professional accomplishments.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources