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FOLLOW UP ON A JOB INTERVIEW?

Posted by Mark Baber
Dec 15 2010

JobNewsRADIO.com

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JOB INTERVIEW HELP

Follow up on a Job interview?

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- JOB SEEKER QUESTION:

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I recently applied for a job at the local dollar store. About a month later, I was there buying things. The boss, (who is an acquaintance of mine) asked if I wanted to go for an interview the next day. I said of course!

So, she said she would call me that day and tell me what time she would like me to come in the following day. I assume she got very busy, because she didn't call. So, the next morning, I called as soon as they opened and asked when she would like me to come in. She said 1:30.

I went in that afternoon. I suppose the interview went well, I have never done an interview before. She seemed happy and I think I answered everything correctly.

She told me she would let whoever know the next day who got the position. (She is giving 2 part time positions.)

So, I really want this job but I'm not sure how I should go about this.

Should I call her and ask her about her decision, since she forgot to call last time? Or should I just wait? I want to show that I really want this job and I'm excited about it, but I don't want to be a bother.

If I do call, what should I say? I'm thinking something along the lines of "Thanks for taking time to interview me, I don't mean to bother you, but I'm really excited and I'm wondering if you have made a decision on the job?"

Any advice helps. Thanks.

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ANSWER:

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From: - Mark Baber, Senior Placement Specialist

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This was your first job interview, you were unprepared. Most employers make their decisions for such part-time jobs with relative promptness. That doesn't mean they are not interested in you. And it doesn't mean you won't get the job, if you really want that particular job.

My advice is that you not make the dollar store your only job choice, though still pursue it, if that's what you want. There are likely other retail jobs available in your same area that offer part-time jobs. Over 70% of part-time jobs are not posted to web sites and newspapers. Meaning this, there are probably other jobs available that you may find are more eager to hire you.

Remember the following when you go to your next job interview: All employers want you to talk about how well you understand and can perform the job they will hire you for. In your next interview, bring along a list of duties you can already perform to their benefit, put them on your resume; in other words, when you speak in your next job interview, tell them you want the job, tell them what you already know about how to perform that job, and how you will exceed their expectations for that job, if you are hired. Do that in the job interview, as a preparation to your job interview follow-up.

To follow-up - which is the primary question herein - be assertive, honest, enthusiastic, let the employer know you will be following-up the job interview, and you say that in the initial job interview - don't wait to say you want the job - and tell them exactly when (no more than a couple days for a part-time job) and how you will get back with them to check on your results, then do it, make the call or drop by to check personally with the hiring agent exactly as you say you will.

Actions-speak-louder-than-words. Seeing your dedication to being on time for the interview, being prepared for the job interview, and offering additional documents and comments that assure the hiring agent that you can perform some duties now, and can be trained on others in short time - you prove to the hiring agent that you are the most prepared and motivated job candidate they have seen. Say it all again when you do your job interview follow-up.

Good luck in your job search!

http://www.JobNewsRADIO.com

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

THE JOB SEARCH SHOW - HIRING SECRETS REVEALED

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 08 2010

LEARN HOW TO GET HIRED SMART & FAST  

DON'T LEAVE YOUR JOB SEARCH RESULTS TO CHANCE

. CLICK HERE FOR EXPERT ADVICE

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

4 WAYS TO BEAT THE HIGH COST OF YOUR JOB SEARCH

Posted by Mark Baber
Dec 08 2010

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4 WAYS TO BEAT THE HIGH COST

OF YOUR JOB SEARCH

AND STILL GET HIRED

December 8, 2010 - New York, NY -

By Mark Baber, for JobNewsRADIO.com

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Unless a job-seeker is using a close-network of associates, most individuals implementing a job-search require multiple tools in their job-search tool-chest, many of which have a price-tag attached.

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Tools most people require to perform a guided and successful job search, include several customized professional resumes to match specific employers you plan to impress; workplace references professionally prepared and focused and also customized to address specific candidate strengths/weaknesses; many applicants benefit from including with their resume and other hiring documents, depending upon your industry - third-party background or credit checks, or both; a computer on-which to organize and archive and research possible employers and job search documents and to have software to track each company with which you submit your resume; not to mention the requirement to access the internet, as many companies, nowadays, exclusively accept job applications via online processes operated by their Human Resources experts – even to the point of using online resources to set and confirm job interviews. Then there is the cost of a cell or other telephone device for job related communications, and an email account, so you can keep in touch digitally. Of course, prior to a job interview, many folks purchase new suits, shoes, have their hair styled; then there is cost of gas to get to the interview, or bus or plane or taxi fare, so on and so on.

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.............HOW TO CUT YOUR JOB SEARCH COSTS WAYS TO CUT YOUR JOB SEARCH COSTS

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The unledgered cost of a job search, once those related bills are associated firmly with the cost-of-finding-a-new-job, can be staggering, mounting even into thousands-of-dollars; and often times a deal-killer, for those who cannot muster the cost of the job-search resources listed above.

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If you find yourself in that circumstance, you may wonder to yourself the same thing that millions of other job-seekers have been thinking: How do you beat the high cost of a job search, and still get hired?

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It’s easy. Don’t spend the money; but still get hired promptly, or in a reasonable time-frame, anyway; whereby your efforts are guided by professional hiring counselors – as much or as little as you need. There is no ‘hard part,’ to this strategy. In fact, for each of the pesky job-search items identified for the tool-chest above, there is a professional counter-part available – at no charge – for those who decide to save some cash.

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Consider this: libraries are often forgotten as a valuable resource for organizing or implementing a professional job-search. A majority of U.S. libraries offer free access to computers pre-loaded with word-processing and spreadsheet software, that allows users to interface with the internet to harvest job-search intelligence, submit and follow-up with resumes, initiate job-search social networking contacts, and other related activities; with that in mind, maybe there is no need to spend the cash to upgrade your home-computer. And don’t forget the myriad business directories typically found in most libraries, which offer thousands of employer hiring contacts. And industry trade magazine, which carry job postings. And valuable certified training – yes, that’s correct – certified training. Many local libraries partner with non-profit organizations, such as SCORE and UNITED WAY and GOODWILL INDUSTRIES, to bring in training specialists who lead seminars and classes there on library premises.

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Another choice: Many national restaurants, hotels, motels, fast-food and retail outlets offer free WiFi, to attract consumers to their places of business. Most laptop computers can access those wireless systems. I’ve seen it happen with job candidates I know who used very inexpensive USB based digital phone devices to make-and-take job-search related long-distance phone calls, while being connected to free WiFi signals, such as those mentioned above. They were all successfully hired.

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Especially in retail, and in most workplace environments where an employee – manager or not – is going to handle or deposit cash or other valuable property, running a background check or credit-check is something that will likely occur. How do you beat the expense of those checks when you want to include such a valuable confirmation of trust with your resume? Let the employer pay, of course; that’s a no-brainer.

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But the smart job applicant, those willing to spend the money or find an equal, but free, alternative, have those checks done in advance and submit verifiable copies with their initial resume submission. Such initiative makes the difference between being noticed and going into the “we’ll think about it” pile. Department of Labor (2008) statistics confirm that of the small percent of applicants brought in for a job interview, the majority of those candidates customized their hiring documents and pre-supposed certain testing or qualifying questions and addressed those interests inside the resume submission documents.

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In the case of background-check data, when you want to confirm your current or past address or addresses, past phone numbers, arrest records or lack-thereof, traffic violations status or other minor interactions with local authorities, court cases, past employers – an array of such details are to be found for nearly every county in the United States. Digital conversion of hardcopy public records, court records, police records, city/county/township/school-district records, and other public organization records began decades ago. It’s out there. I often research the job candidates I personally recruit in the same manner. I go to the city/county where they live, find the county court online records, and see what I can find. I do the same thing for each city listed and associated with an employer on that candidate’s resume. The stories I could tell; those aside, I usually suggest to job candidates to run their own ‘vanity’ background-checks (as I did on them), archive copies of the searches, their respective URLs, etc… and print out, as verification, the resulting pages to confirm whatever it is they require for their job search. I’ve seen hundreds of hires occur based on such documents. Why trust them? Because anyone can verify the truth for themselves at any time, as it’s in the public record.

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These are just a few of the ways a serious job applicant can jazz up their job-search with some professional level pizz-zazz that often carries a hefty price-tag. There are other ways, too, for example, accessing a local job-counselor at the federally funded CareerOneStop centers, found in every state, and manned by trained job-search specialist, who can lead you to resources that help you get hired, as well as help you organize those customized job-resumes and job-references, and so on and so on.

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Best of luck in your job search.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Business Management Job Search Statistics

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 08 2010

JobNewsRADIO.com

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Finding Management & Business Channel Employers

........ Don't leave your job search results to chance.

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Learn which keywords drive your industry ... hiring habits, which parts of your job-experience are most in demand, and other important details about what motivates employers in your industry to extend a job offer, which job titles are deemed most urgent and why, and read the latest statistics on job-openings-verses-jobapplicants, as it relates to Management and Business hiring ....

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JOB SEARCH Magazine/Directory

Find And Meet 100's Of Hiring Experts In Your Region Of The US And In Your Specialty

Put your best foot forward with a free subscription

Research Your Industry

Search Jobs

With your resume and portfolio set, you'll be able to search and contact employers with one quick step!

Meet Hiring Agents

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Which keywords a jobseeker chooses to use in uncovering job posting in their field via major search engines, or other job post related websites, often determines how many, and which types of, industry jobs appear in the search results. Consider reviewing the various job title and industry specific keywords found to be the most used in your industry, as confirmed by the industry respected job-board operator Beyond.com.

Management Keyword Searches

1. Manager

2. Quality

3. Director

4. Business

5. Retail

6. President

7. Operations

8. Supervisor

9. MBA

10. Marketing

11. Project Manager

12. Purchasing

13. Vice President

14. CFO

OTHER KEYWORDS

Most Popular Keywords in Management & Executive

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Account Manager jobs

Business Development Manager jobs

Director jobsExecutive jobs

Marketing Manager jobs

Operations Management jobs

Product Manager jobs

Program Manager jobs

Project Manager jobs

Sales Manager jobs

Training Manager jobs

Other keywords » Other Keywords

Branch Manager jobs

Business Analyst jobs

Business Process Consultant jobs

Chief Executive Officer jobs

Education Consultant jobs

Engineering Manager jobs

Finance Manager jobs

General Manager jobs

Healthcare Consultant jobs

Human Resources Consulting jobs

Implementation Consultant jobs

It Consultant jobs

Management Consultant jobs

Market Research jobs

Marketing Consultant jobs

Risk Manager jobs

Strategic Planning jobs

Technical Manager jobs

Vice President jobs

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Search Management Positions

Administrative Services Manager

Advertising Manager

Assistant Director

Assistant Manager

Chief communications Officer

Chief Executive Office

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Information Officer

Chief Marketing Officer

Chief Operations Office

Chief Resources Officer

Chief Security Officer

Chief Technology Officer

Compensation & Benefits Manager

Construction manager

Director

Distribution manager

Engineering Manager

Executive Director

Executive Vice President

Financial Manager

Food Service Manager

Gaming Manager

General Counsel

General Manager

Government Service Executive

Human Resources Manager

Industrial Production Manager

Information Technology Manager

Management Trainee

Manager

Managing Director

Marketing manager

Medical & Health Services Manager

Partner

President

Principal

Program Manager

Public Relations Manager

Real Estate Manager

Regional/Multi-Unit Manager

Restaurant Management

Revenue Management

Sales Manager

Security Management

Senior Vice President

Supervisor

Training & Development Manager

Transportation manager

Vice President

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Review Management Trends

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Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Management sector. The graphs represent the change in volume of Management job and resume postings within the last several months.

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Sale and Business Management Jobs

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Research Personality Types

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Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles. What is your personality type?

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The top three personality types in the Management field are INTJ, INFJ, and ISTJ.

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INTJ (Introvert, Intuitive, Thinker, Judger)

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People of this type tend to be: autonomous, aloof, and intellectual; imaginative, innovative, and unique; critical, analytical, and logical; intellectually curious, driven to learn and increase their competence and knowledge; socially cautious and reserved; organized and definitive. The most important thing to INTJs is their independence and being able to live according to their own standards.

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Sales and Business Management Jobs

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Management Job Descriptions

Jobs in Management

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What Management career suits you best? Below is just one career to consider. If it's not for you, consider researching many more career posibilities in Management.

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Computer and Information Systems Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

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If you are looking for some information about a specific type of job or are just curious about other career paths, review the following positions to help choose the right one for you.

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Administrative Services Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate supportive services of an organization, such as recordkeeping, mail distribution, telephone operator/receptionist, and other office support services. May oversee facilities planning and maintenance and custodial operations.

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Advertising and Promotions Managers

Plan and direct advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or give-aways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.

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Chief Executives

Determine and formulate policies and provide the overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within the guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.

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Compensation and Benefits Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities and staff of an organization.

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Computer and Information Systems Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

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Construction Managers

Plan, direct, coordinate, or budget, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, and implementation.

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Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School

Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic, clerical, or auxiliary activities of public or private elementary or secondary level schools.

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Education Administrators, Postsecondary

Plan, direct, or coordinate research, instructional, student administration and services, and other educational activities at postsecondary institutions, including universities, colleges, and junior and community colleges.

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Engineering Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering or research and development in these fields.

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Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers

On a paid basis, manage farms, ranches, aquacultural operations, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, cotton gins, packing houses, or other agricultural establishments for employers. Carry out production, financial, and marketing decisions relating to the managed operations following guidelines from the owner. May contract tenant farmers or producers to carry out the day-to-day activities of the managed operation. May supervise planting, cultivating, harvesting, and marketing activities. May prepare cost, production, and other records. May perform physical work and operate machinery.

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Farmers and Ranchers

On an ownership or rental basis, operate farms, ranches, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, or other agricultural production establishments which produce crops, horticultural specialties, livestock, poultry, finfish, shellfish, or animal specialties. May plant, cultivate, harvest, perform post-harvest activities, and market crops and livestock; may hire, train, and supervise farm workers or supervise a farm labor contractor; may prepare cost, production, and other records. May maintain and operate machinery and perform physical work.

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Financial Managers

Plan, direct, and coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.

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Food Service Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages.

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Funeral Directors

Perform various tasks to arrange and direct funeral services, such as coordinating transportation of body to mortuary for embalming, interviewing family or other authorized person to arrange details, selecting pallbearers, procuring official for religious rites, and providing transportation for mourners.

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Gaming Managers

Plan, organize, direct, control, or coordinate gaming operations in a casino. Formulate gaming policies for their area of responsibility.

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General and Operations Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of companies or public and private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Includes owners and managers who head small business establishments whose duties are primarily managerial.

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Human Resources Managers

Plan, direct, and coordinate human resource management activities of an organization to maximize the strategic use of human resources and maintain functions such as employee compensation, recruitment, personnel policies, and regulatory compliance.

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Industrial Production Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.

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Legislators

Develop laws and statutes at the Federal, State, or local level.

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Lodging Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations.

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Management Analysts

Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplifications and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.

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Marketing Managers

Determine the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.

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Medical and Health Services Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate medicine and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

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Natural Sciences Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.

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Postmasters and Mail Superintendents

Direct and coordinate operational, administrative, management, and supportive services of a U.S. post office; or coordinate activities of workers engaged in postal and related work in assigned post office.

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Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties.

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Public Relations Managers

Plan and direct public relations programs designed to create and maintain a favorable public image for employer or client; or if engaged in fundraising, plan and direct activities to solicit and maintain funds for special projects and nonprofit organizations.

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Purchasing Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services.

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Sales Managers

Direct the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.

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Social and Community Service Managers

Plan, organize, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.

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Training and Development Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.

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Training and Development Specialists

Conduct training and development programs for employees.

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Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with governmental policies and regulations.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

NOVEMBER 2010 - Monster Employment Index

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 02 2010

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..............................Monster Employment Index

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Monster Employment Index Annual Growth Rate

Stable at 13% in November

Edges Down on Monthly Basis

New York, December 2, 2010

November 2010 Index Highlights:

•Tenth consecutive month of positive annual growth rate - stable at 13 percent in November

•Retail trade registers strong growth in November, suggesting positive outlook for consumer trends during the mid-November to January sales season

•Health care and social assistance records accelerated annual growth, with long-term trends most improved for healthcare support workers

•Management of companies and enterprises; and finance and insurance edge down on annual basis in November possibly indicating continued uncertainty in the banking and related fields

The Monster Employment Index is a monthly gauge of U.S. online job demand based on a real-time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large representative selection of corporate career Web sites and job boards, including Monster.com®.

Click here to get the full November MEI report.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

How NOT to Start Your Cover Letter

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 01 2010

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JobNewsRADDIO.com

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................. How NOT ...

To Start Your Cover Letter

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Posted By: Jessica Holbrook In: Job Seeker - Cover Letters

http://www.jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/how-not-to-start-your-cover-letter-4860-article.html

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..................... HOW YOUR COVER LETTER HELPS GET YOU HIRED

If you’re looking for some awesome cover letter advice ... on how *NOT* to start your cover letter (and some great examples of how you should be starting it) then read on!

On a weekly basis any hiring manager probably receives between 50 and … well, probably hundreds of resumes and cover letters. The key is to catch his or her attention from the start; and the best place to do that is in your cover letter. So I am going to tell you about the worst possible way to start your cover letter—and then give you some creative alternatives to use instead.

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MOST BORING INTRO LINE

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Here is the most boring intro line - because everyone uses it:

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Please accept my resume for consideration

of the (XYZ) position within your organization.

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What a snoozer! Everyone uses that line; let’s see … being like everyone else isn’t going to get you very far in your job search now is it? No, it’s not. So you need to be different. But not just different — you need to be unique and appear more valuable than the average joe. Let’s take a look at some more creative and attention grabbing opening lines:

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Administrative:

If you are spending too much time compiling tedious lists of general office duties and administrative tasks, then I have the solution for you. Try this: “My experiences in office administration and client services have equipped me with a multitude of skills including office management, business operations, and exemplary customer service. I am confident that my application of these and my many other skills would be an asset to your company.”

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Customer Service:

It’s twice as hard to attract a new customer as it is to maintain an existing one. Unfortunately, this fact is often overlooked by many businesses. So exploit this reality. Here’s an example of what you should write: “Delivering high-quality, responsive service is vital in (industry x). And that’s exactly what you’ll get when you hire me. As my resume indicates, I have worked in client services for more than (number) years, so you won’t have to incur great expense while training me.

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Nonprofit:

Try something like this: “In today’s challenging economic climate, many people will respond to your advertisement. Few will be interviewed. One will be hired.

However, of the many who will respond, few will be as qualified as I am, having in-depth experience in community and public outreach. No one else will bring my track record and the expertise I offer—expertise that equips me to immediately begin delivering results for you with maximum positive effect to your bottom line.

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General:

“Integrity. Innovation. Initiative.

If you have these qualities in mind for the position of (position title) then I suggest we meet to discuss the numerous qualifications I would bring to your organization. With my demonstrated track record of successfully directing pharmacy operations and introducing initiatives that directly impacted the bottom line, I am confident that I would be an excellent fit for the position at (company name).

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Of course, these are only a few sample introductions, and the remainder of your cover letter needs to be just as dynamic as the introduction. But nothing is more important than that initial first impression; and you are sure to win them over when you choose something unique, creative, and captivating.

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Comments Posted by: Kathie

While I see the point that Jessica is making in her article, I do have a problem with her suggestions. Although they might be eye catching, and definitely different from the most common, but to me they seem a little too confident - almost bragging which could also be offensive. What I am looking for is something in between them both.

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Posted by: Cover letter format

The following statement of yours is a gem and needs to be understood well by the cover letter writer: "But nothing is more important than that initial first impression."

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Posted by: Steven C.

Kathie, the level of confidence you should exhibit depends on the position. For example, sales reps want to appear extremely confident, executives want to appear extremely confident, when you apply for a job you want to give the impression you are confident that you are perfect for the job. How confident you want to show depends on the job or the audience you write too. For example, a trait law enforcement professionals share is a high degree of assertiveness and confidence, sometimes mistaken for arrogance. It's the nature of the job, so an applicant wants to show his confidence and assertiveness. Now, if you want to apply as a librarian, you still want to show confidence but you probably dp nit want to set the same tone as a person applying for a swat team position. The trick is to know the audience you are writing the cover letter to and set the tone accordingly. Some of the suggestions in the article will work in some situations. Others wont.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources