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How To Recognize And Answer “Secret” Illegal Job interview Questions

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 19 2011

How To Know And Answer “Secret”

Illegal Job Interview Questions

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..................... Illegal Job Interview Questions

WHEN YOU ARE IN THE JOB INTERVIEW HOT SEAT

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By Melissa Kennedy

Posted On: 1/19/2011 4:25:20 PM In: Diversity in the Workplace

http://jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/how-to-answer-the-secret-illegal-interview-5021-article.html

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When you are being interviewed by a potential employer ..., there are several types of interview questions that are illegal for them to ask. These questions include asking how old you are, your marital status, if you have children, your religion, your political affiliations, disabilities and racial background. These questions are prohibited by both federal and state laws, because not hiring someone based on the answers to these questions is discriminatory.

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Most people who work in Human Resources, or who are often in charge of interviewing candidates are well aware of this restriction, and will be sure not to ask these types of questions. But, just because they don't ask these questions doesn't mean that they don't have them. This is where the “secret” illegal question comes in, because it is often only asked in the interviewers mind. And, since it isn't expressed, you don't have a chance to respond to it.

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Frequently, this comes into play when you can't hide the answers to some of these questions that can't be asked. Some examples would be, if you are physically challenged, over 50, are a member of an ethnic minority, or your resume makes it clear that you are a single mom returning to the workplace. While the interviewer can't specifically address any of these factors, they may be taking them into consideration and asking questions about it to themselves. They may wonder if your disability will limit your work abilities and if you have the physical strength to handle a long work day, or they may ask themselves if you family obligations will take valuable time away from you work responsibilities. So, when you are in this sort of situation, how is the best way to deal with it?

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Basically, you have two choices. And, this is where doing a little bit of research on the company and the corporate culture can really help. Is the culture open minded and innovative? Are they a very formal company that prides themselves on being traditional? By finding out who they are as a company, you can get a better idea of what “secret” questions they may be asking and it can help you decide which way to choose.

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Option 1:

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Address your obvious situation directly. If you have a visible physical disability, mention it and let them know that your physical challenges don't interfere with your ability to perform the job. If you are a mom who is returning to the workplace, when the interviewer asks why you are looking for a job now, you can tell them that your children are older now and you feel confident that it is the right time to start devoting more of yourself to your career. By addressing the situation head on, you can answer the questions they may have without them having to ask. The truth is that just because they can't ask the question, doesn't mean they don't have any, and more than likely, they will come up with their own answers, so you might as well help them out. On the other hand, because the interviewer knows that these questions aren't allowed, by talking about your situation openly, you may make them feel uncomfortable, and it is possible that they weren't even concerned about the issue until you brought it up.

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Option 2:

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Address any of these concerns indirectly. Think about what question the interviewer may be asking themselves and offer plenty of counterbalancing information to reassure them about your abilities. The key to this option is to try to understand the intent of the question. For example, if you are over 50 and you think that the interviewer may be concerned that you aren't going to be able to pick up new skills and training easily, you can highlight skills and experience that show your willingness to learn new things and your openness to adapting to new technologies. This will reassure the interviewer that your age isn't a problem in the areas he may be doubtful about. No matter what your particular situation is, it is important to think about which of your key abilities demonstrates that you are capable of performing the job and hit them hard, leaving no doubt that you are a great candidate for the job. Be sure though, to not come across as defensive about yourself or to in any way imply that the interviewer has unspoken, discriminatory questions.

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Whichever option you chose, the key is to attempt to understand what sort of ideas and preconceptions an interviewer might have about you. One way to find out is to ask yourself what sort of concerns you would have, if you were hiring for this position and were interviewing yourself. This should give you an idea of what concerns they might have and give you an idea of which of your strengths, accomplishments and abilities you should stress in order to strongly counterbalance any unspoken concerns about your ability to be a good fit for the company and the position.

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By Melissa Kennedy - Melissa is a 9 year blog veteran and a freelance writer helping others find the job of their dreams.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Limited Time - FREE - JOB SEARCH MAGAZINE- PDF EDITION

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 12 2011

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Employment Index Up 13% Year over Year

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 06 2011

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Monster Index

Monster Employment Index Up

13% Year over Year in December

Marking 11th Consecutive Month of Growth

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December 2010 Index Highlights:

• Eleventh consecutive month of positive annual growth rate - stable at 13 percent in December

• Index edges down four points (3 percent) in December on monthly basis, generally meeting seasonal precedent for the end-of-quarter, end-of-year period

• Mining and utilities lead all sectors in annual growth while wholesale trade and transportation also trend higher

• Business and financial operations exhibits notable expansion in 2010, with improved online recruitment trends for accounting and financial professionals

• All 28 metro markets recorded positive annual growth in December

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

JOB INTERVIEW “TELLS” SOME EMPLOYERS USE AGAINST YOU

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 01 2011

JobNewsRADIO.com

WELCOME TO 2011

THE JobDOG ANSWERS JOB SEARCH QUESTIONS

JOB INTERVIEW “TELLS”

SOME EMPLOYERS USE AGAINST YOU

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Recently a Director-level business manager complained to me that he just learned he was knocked out of the hiring process with a major retailer because he wasn’t “animated” enough in his job interview. Being a poker player, he asked me what other job interview “tells” he may be missing.

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Having conducted thousands of job interviews myself, and been involved with tens-of-thousands more, as a recruit manager dealing simultaneously with multiple national employer clients with ongoing appetites to hire at all levels, the consensus from those involved is that, generally speaking, in the first two minutes after an initial meeting with a job applicant, the applicant transmits several lasting impressions to the job interviewer. Impressions that go to the heart of how appropriate a job applicant may be for filling the job at hand. Remembering that the job interviewer is often the person who decides whom gets moved forward, or hired, job candidates could strive to make those first-impressions workplace related positive memories. Or at least be able to recognize what you may be saying wordlessly through your “tells.”

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Unfortunately, for most of us, in a job interview, many tend to project a faux-passive demeanor, a hyper-cooperative attitude; one that is at times attentive, maybe a little nervous, or mildly apprehensive, possibly even tinged with a bit of anxiety, for some. Those attributes leak through any positive persona we present at a job interview, and catch attention of the job interviewer. In that way, one or more less-than-positive personal habit or behavior, ones we’d rather not share openly, are sometimes revealed to the job interviewer.

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Such “tells” are easy to identify, which is why so many seasoned job interviewers look for them. Some of those behaviors are presented below. Recognize them for what they are – potential deal killers – work to edit such habits from your job interview repertoire. Not because I suggest it, but because job interviewers and hiring-agents of various flavors notice them, and not always in a good way.

To be clear, I’m not speaking of obvious and stupid and outrageous behavior, like showing up to a job interview drunk, or high on a drug – legal or not; or wearing inappropriately revealing or too-casual clothing; or being argumentative or in a foul or unkind frame of mind, or chewing gum, highlighting a tattoo or piercing, or tapping fingers or feet or pens, or in need of a bath or a toothbrush. No, those behaviors are easy to recognize. I speak here of more subtle “tells,” as a poker-player might call them.

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And how high are the stakes for you in your job search?

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For instance, one of the top “tells” that job interviewers look for is a lack of genuine common politeness or good manners. Or worse, feigned, or faked sincerity of politeness or good manners. Hiring agents wonder how sincere could be the motives of a person who would fake politeness.

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Next is the “head in hand” pose; whether awaiting the job interview to start, or in the job interview itself, to do so suggests a message of boredom or fatigue when you rest or touch your head to your hand to relax your neck muscles or try to seem inquisitive or thoughtful. Job interviewers often look for that behavior and take it as a sign that you are less interested in the job than you lead them to believe. Or that your mind is elsewhere. Don’t leave the job interviewer with those impressions. Maintain an attentive mind and posture throughout the job interview.

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The third most common job interview “tell” is lack of engagement with the job interviewer; usually accompanied by near-zero eye-to-eye contact with the job interviewer, and shy handshake, and possibly a short self-introduction, delivered with little to no smile or much enthusiasm – remember, this usually happens in the first two-minutes of meeting, so most applicants are distracted by the process at hand, that’s when “tells” leak through into a public domain.

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As simple as this may sound, if you believe you may be performing this two-minute “tell,” try taking a few opportunities to introduce yourself to several random people prior to a job interview, like your mailman, or a café manager, or neighbor. Just look them in the eye, hold out your hand and smile as you introduce yourself. Don’t laugh at this suggestion. It is an easy and valuable, and proven, way for job candidates at all levels to upgrade job interview skills; from CFOs to entry-level retail hires, I’ve seen this technique used successfully.

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The fourth offending job interview “tell” is mild disarray, atypical disorder, possible misalignment of practical logic, as it regards a particular job applicant. Clothes noticeably unmatched, maybe not pressed or even fresh, un-kept hair – but trained and seemingly successful with other employers; messy job application without all sections filled, professional documents overtly simplified and generic, or just the reverse, with documents unnecessarily complicated - like resume and job references; or not following prescribed recruitment or pre-employment processes, as in changed from the norm; oddball communications with hiring contacts involved – all speak to a sense of a hiring mis-match.

Such behavior doesn’t prove a person cannot perform workplace duties admirably. It only suggests that such individuals require a thorough analysis by decision makers, to confirm appropriateness to the workplace culture and longevity. Too often, for such candidates, added scrutiny causes untimely delays or ends the job interview process early, while other less square-peg-in-a-round-hole-applicants move forward. Is it fair? Probably not. But high-volume employers – in point of fact, employers of any kind - can legally and rationally react accordingly, when pursuing such job candidate attributes. Attributes which often prove to be counter-productive to the hiring process - a time waster, as in the end many such job candidates fail to match the same H.R. expectations as those who successfully circumvent the hiring process.

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If you believe that you are not sending such subtle mixed messages during your job interviews, it’s time to reconsider your basic belief-system, as it regards job search. The advice here is that you try and discover your “tells” before the next job interviewer does it for you.

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Arrrfff … arrrfff! - the JobDOG

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources