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10 Job Interview Questions To Ask

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 28 2011

JobNewsRADIO.com Job Search Resources

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10 Job Interview Questions

To Ask - IF YOU WANT THE JOB!

Don't Be Caught With Your Job Interview Skills Down

Author Ken Suddheim

AUTHOR KEN SUNDHEIM

Posted By: Ken Sundheim In: Entry Level and College Grads

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When interviewing at any level ... and, especially entry-level, there are certain questions you can ask that will help you stand out from the crowd. Following these rules will boost your value on the open job market and result in more offers and, best of yet, less rejections.

When interviewing at any level and, especially entry-level, there are certain questions you can ask that will help you stand out from the crowd. Following these rules will boost your value on the open job market and result in more offers and, best of yet, less rejections.

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Before you read this, always remember that there is a direct relationship

between the quality of questions that you ask and

the amount of research you've done on the company

in which you are interviewing with.

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1. "I saw that your CEO came from (college, industry and location), your CFO came from here (college, industry and location) and your COO has something completely different, what types of personality traits make people so successful at this organization?"

Believe it or not, countless studies at the nation's most prestigious universities have done analysis on hundreds upon hundreds of executives and none share all of the 6 or 7 common traits they were looking for. So, don't expect the CFO to be a numbers guy as the presumption would look awful foolish if he was the company's party animal.

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The Closing Technique That Wins, Gets High Job Offers And Turns Heads

2. "I can assure you that prior to leaving this interview, I know that this is the type of position I want because of x, y and z. What else can I do to make you feel more comfortable with bringing me on Company's XYZ team?"

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People Love Speaking About Themselves:

3. "Please, don't misconstrue this as prying, however do you mind me asking a little bit about you and, essentially how did you get into this business?"

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As a matter of fact, listening is one of the best forms of persuasive communication. If you have the ability to interject, ask how big marlin are. If you feel uncomfortable asking a potential obvious and elementary inquiry, say

"This may be common knowledge, but..."

Setting Up The Lob To Give You Match Point Slam

4. "As a whole, what facets of the job do the other employees my age most enjoy? How much of their time is spent is doing so? What don't they enjoy?"

- Now, tell them how this is great and even more intriguing because, your skill sets are the ones he or she just listed.

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Maintaining and Building Relationships 101

5. "If for reason, I left the office and you found somebody who was a perfect, perfect match and decided to hire the person, can I keep this relationship active with a quick email every few months?"

If the person is smart, they will be impressed.

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If Asked What You Are Looking For, Ask This Question Right Back

6. "Would what I'm looking for is a company that is looking for somebody like me count as an answer? The reason I say so is that I can't tell you what type of field I want to go into at this age.

However, I can tell you that I want to be close to others who are young, intelligent, vibrant, passionate about becoming better and those who don't want to dump their load of work on others."

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Getting Them To Loosen Up On Compensation With A Sentence

7. "What is the range that you've budgeted for this particular role?"

Most of the time, they will be impressed by a few other questions that they won't want to risk loosing you for $3,000. Take the firm salary out of the equation.

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You Should Know This Beforehand From Research, But Not Bad To Have In Back Pocket

8. "From my research, I have these guys as your main competitors (come w/ website print outs). Am I on point? Do you mind one more question? What are your strategic advantages and market positions?"

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Another Closing Tactic - Getting Commitment From The Other Side

9. "I would love to type up the notes that I took during today's meeting so I am able to gather my thoughts and wait accordingly. Is Monday afternoon around 3:30ish a good time to send the email? After that, I'll just wait for your response."

Here's the fun part, if you pick 3:30, there is more of a chance of the person taking a few minute break and having a few minutes to potentially call you. Be prompt, concise, but thorough in your analysis. Remember, presumptions kill all persuasion efforts and can turn a meeting or hiring cycle right against you.

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Find Out Timeline For Hire, But Not Directly

10. "What situation currently arises and making the need for this position?"

Let them say how they are bogged down with work and in your thank you email, reiterate how you would like to take some of that work from them.

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Situations You May Run Into With Questions

If you're interviewing with people who do not know what they are doing, they are not going to like questions because they think your job, as a recent college graduate is to site there and beg for the job.

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If you find yourself at a good company and you're in front of one of these types of people, keep a zipper. However, the more seasoned decision makers will not only welcome these inquiries, but will be impressed by them.

GOOD LUCK IN YOUR JOB SEARCH!

Keywords: retail jobs, it jobs, administrative jobs, restaurant jobs, accounting jobs, finance jobs, engineering jobs, sales jobs, business management jobs, job interview help, job search, how to set a job interview

Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Your Next Job Could be a Tweet Away

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 12 2011

JobNewsRadio

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Your Next Job Could be a Tweet Away

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. Posted By: Nimish Thakkar In: Networking

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Social Media Job Search

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From tweeting about office gossip ... to discussing dating nightmares, social media has literally redefined the way we communicate about our personal and professional lives. As a career coach and professional resume writer, I am witnessing an emerging trend: On the employment front, both job seekers and hiring managers are embracing social media with open arms. In fact, the utilization of social media is so prevalent, the very term “job search” is now shedding its legacy status and is being upgraded to “job connect” instead.

Employment dynamics have changed

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As of July 2010, the unemployment rate touched nearly 9.5% and the number of unemployed individuals now peaks at around 14.6 million. What’s worse? The average workweek is approximately 34.1 hours, leaving many candidates the option to pursue a second job. With so many qualified professionals looking for work, the competition is undeniably intense.

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“Connections” is the success mantra in today’s hyper-competitive landscape, and job seekers need to spend more time networking with key decision makers and hiring managers. While both employers and employees appear to be retaining job boards and other traditional recruitment strategies, social media appears to serve as a valuable addition to prevalent tools.

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From an employer’s perspective, Dale DeSteno, a Direct Hire Recruiter with Kelly Services, considers social media an attractive proposition, primarily because of the potential “viral effect it could generate.”

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Online networking connects people

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Online networking can help you penetrate otherwise impregnable corporate fortresses and make actual contact with a hiring manager, without having to deal with the embarrassment of getting past gatekeepers and infamous switchboard operators. If you wanted to work at XYZ Company, for example, consider searching LinkedIn contacts. For well-networked professionals, it wouldn’t be unusual to find a connection that may be just a few degrees away. Why just LinkedIn? Even Facebook and other social networking forums may help you connect with an important decision maker or recruiter at your dream company.

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Recruiters regularly mine LinkedIn to find potential hires and fulfill job orders. “I have had great luck with meeting candidates (and even clients) using LinkedIn,” says Dale DeSteno.

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Apart from the ability to search candidates, LinkedIn allows professionals and peers to provide valuable recommendation and endorsements.

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Establish your brand; blog your way to a job

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Want to be even more proactive? Consider browsing through top-ranked blogs in your profession. In addition to niche job postings, you may be able to network with a key decision maker. Nick, a savvy networker, does just that. It was Nick’s regular practice to congratulate authors and provide valuable feedback and insights. This simple practice not only allowed him to snowball his network, but also empowered him with access to promising leads that are normally at the disposal of industry-recognized authors.

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If you are an expert within your niche, consider writing about your profession. Blog posts, Twitter updates, Facebook posts, LinkedIn updates -- all of these are wonderful tools to create and disseminate information to a large audience.

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The advantage of creating and distributing unique content is that there is always a possibility of generating viral publicity through forwarded posts. The strategy provides valuable opportunities to establish one’s brand as an expert and reach the desks of otherwise hard-to-reach senior executives.

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Leverage multimedia to make your job search interactive

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The rising popularity of YouTube has encouraged many job seekers to post video resumes and short presentations. With just one click, hiring managers can review these video resumes and correlate the paper resume with an actual person. The trend seems to be catching up, especially amongst technology-savvy job seekers.

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Kathy Jegen, an HR professional, launched an aggressive job search campaign using her website (KathyJegen.com), social media, and a YouTube video. Speaking of her experience, Ms. Jegen says, “Utilizing my methods I took my job search from no response to my resume (using traditional job search boards), to up to 10 requests a day for my resume. I now have a contract opportunity that requires government clearance and will begin this contract position when I get official clearance. I will have the opportunity to interview for a position that will lead to a VP role in two years.”

The benefits of social media certainly stand out, but like any other high visibility medium, it does call for some discipline and policing. Given the public reach and accessibility of social media, it is not unusual for hiring managers to find online postings, videos, and pictures that could jeopardize your career success.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

SHOULD YOU OUT YOURSELF ON YOUR RESUME

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 07 2011

JobNewsRADIO

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GAY OR LESBIAN?

OUT YOURSELF ON RESUME .

Should you out yourself

on your resume?

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Posted By: Staff Editor On: 1/13/2011 1:57:35 PM In: Diversity in the Workplace

www.businessworkforceblog.com

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. The law forbids discrimination ... on the basis of race, age and sex no matter where you are, but sexual orientation is another matter. As of now, only 21 states and the District of Columbia have laws on the books banning discrimination in employment on the basis of sexual orientation; 13 of those states and the District also outlaw employment discrimination based on gender identity or expression.

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Most of these states are in the Northeast and on the Pacific Coast, but two clusters of states - one in the upper Central Plains (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin) and one in the Rocky Mountain region (Colorado and New Mexico) - also have enacted such laws.

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If you're a resident of one of the other 29 states -- your blogger, a Pennsylvanian, is one such person -- you may not be completely out of luck, for several hundred counties and cities have also enacted local ordinances protecting lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and (in some cases) transgendered individuals from discrimination in the workplace. For instance, in Pennsylvania, both of the state's largest counties (Philadelphia and Allegheny) and cities (Philadelphia and Pittsburgh) have such ordinances on their books, as do a number of other counties, cities, boroughs and townships in the state. You should check with your county court house or municipal government to see whether such laws exist where you live.

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And if you work for the Federal government, provisions of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 have been interpreted to prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. Even if you are fortunate enough to live or work in any of these situations, the question of coming out on your resume remains a live one.

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Some argue that indicating your orientation in some fashion on your resume will give you a leg up with employers that seek diverse workforces. It would also act as an effective screen for homophobic employers -- which is one reason why others argue that you should downplay anything that might lead an employer to conclude that you are an LGBT individual. In today's environment, where job seekers still way outnumber available jobs, doing something that might automatically shut you out of some of those jobs should be carefully weighed first.

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My take on the subject is this: If the thing that outs you on your resume also fits in well with your career goals and capabilities, you should include it if you live in an area where antidiscrimination laws exist. If you don't, you probably shouldn't.

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By Sandy Smith

Sandy Smith is an award-winning writer and editor who has spent most of his career in public relations and corporate communications. His work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia CityPaper, PGN, and a number of Web sites. Philly-area residents may also recognize him as "MarketStEl" of discussion-board fame.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources