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JOBS-IN-A-BOX: Easy Career Classes That Pay Quick & Big

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
May 18 2011

A Service Of :

Job and Career Resources

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JOBS-IN-A-BOX:

Easy Career Classes

That Pay Quick & Big

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By Mark Baber, Senior Job Placement Specialist

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While most secure professions require many years of specialized education and hands-on experience to master workplace related tasks that earn a fair wage, many modern jobs are relatively easy to train for and can generate respectable incomes in short time. In truth, there are many 21st century vocations that can be learned in under a month of training, and in circumstances whereby required classes are either on-the-job and paid, or offered without charge, and often available locally online for free. And where related job openings are easy to secure in areas across the USA, and come with pay scales in the medium income range of what most American families earn ($40,000), then move upwards thereafter, with increased income and title advancements as short years pass – even when not supported by a college degree or decades of job experience - even right out of High School!

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Sound too good to be true? It’s not!

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Employee Training

Modern Training Center

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Typically, and it is true that, training and job know-how trump all other topics when trying to impress potential employers. Firms who employ such high-focused individuals don’t mind to pay a reasonable wage to people who match the training sought, even when those job seekers have only limited workplace experience. That includes newly certified job candidates within job specialties whose class education included practical on-the-job intern or externship duties, or outright employment, even short-tenured employment, within a particular industry of choice. Such job candidates thereby match employers’ specific hiring needs. Many employers only hire job candidates with such specialized training. In other words, individuals with very specific job, industry or trade know-how that repeats within other similar workplace environments are in demand by employers.

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Some of these specialized job titles may sound familiar to you, having heard them in the past on broadcast T.V. or cable or in radio commercials. These reliable vocations include: Legal Secretary jobs, Office Administration jobs and Administrative Assistant jobs, and File Clerk jobs, Medical Aide jobs and other Health Assistant jobs, and Culinary Arts oriented job titles, such as Food Prep jobs and Cook jobs, Serve Staff jobs, and Counter Clerk jobs in the Fast Food sector, and Chef jobs or Shift Leader jobs, and, of course, Retail jobs and Sales jobs, at all levels to do with customer service jobs, sales clerk jobs, shift manager jobs, and to include allied retail employment such as auditing jobs, merchandising jobs, entry-level management jobs, transportation jobs and delivery jobs, and many more.

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Some of the training programs for these and other allied vocations are available online at no cost whatsoever to students, except to do the work at your own pace to completion. Other free and low-cost programs are found at local technology training centers and community colleges and city/county/state career centers, whereby classes are often melded within a workplace experience, by offering on-the-job internships that coincide with class-work. In some cases, such programs require additional fees for books/supplies and low-cost tuition.

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Many High School and other local School District Career Centers offer short adult classes in some of these in-demand jobs, including basic machine shop jobs and manufacturing jobs training, assembly jobs, even design jobs of various types, especially in computer Help Desk job training, customer service and sales job basics, telemarketing jobs, bookkeeping jobs and accounting clerk jobs, and others. Even as some still believe it is still difficult to find a good job, thousands of High School graduates each year start $40,000-to-$50,000 per-year jobs the week after grad ceremonies, as a result of having been trained in some of job titles mentioned herein.

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Wonder why you hear so much on T.V. and radio about, and read about in newspapers and magazines, of the job titles mentioned above? It’s because demand to hire individuals trained in those vocations will continue to grow for years to come, as confirmed by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. If you are trying to decide on a career choice, or a career change, that offers short training classes, quick employment at a growing rate of pay, and opportunities to advance – then re-read this article, then begin to research and plan your own career future.

GOOD LUCK IN YOUR JOB SEARCH

KEYWORDS: Legal Secretary jobs, Office Administration jobs, Administrative Assistant jobs, File Clerk jobs, Medical Aide jobs, Health Assistant jobs, Food Prep jobs, Cook jobs, Serve Staff jobs, Counter Clerk jobs, Chef jobs, Shift Leader jobs, Retail jobs, Sales jobs, customer service jobs, sales clerk jobs, shift manager jobs, auditing jobs, merchandising jobs, entry-level management jobs, transportation jobs, delivery jobs

Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

5 Tools Employers Use to Determine if You’re the Right Fit

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Apr 11 2011

JobNewsRADIO.com

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5 Tools Employers Use to

Determine if You’re the Right Fit

What to expect: Employer assessments and candidate testing

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What to expect: Employer assessments and candidate testing

Posted By: Jessica Holbrook In: Job Seeker - Interview

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If you’re considering changing jobs for the first time in a while, or find yourself unemployed after many years with the same company, you may run across some surprising requests during your job search. Among the things you may encounter:

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Personality tests

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More and more employers are requiring candidates to complete personality screenings prior to offering them an interview. These types of assessments are particularly common in jobs where you would be required to deal with the public on a regular basis. They’re also widespread in jobs where integrity is paramount, such as positions dealing with money transactions.

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Skills assessments

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A lot of job descriptions require a “demonstrated aptitude” in a particular software program or type of analysis. Beware that this often means that the employer will test you on these skills as part of the interview process. Sometimes you have to pass these tests before even being considered for an interview. For instance, I know someone who was required to complete an hour-long practice test just to apply online for a job as a bank teller.

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Credit checks

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Some companies require applicants to sign a disclosure of their credit report as part of the application process, even for positions that don’t directly deal with finances. Many applicants find this practice invasive, but unfortunately there’s little way around it, other than choosing to not apply at companies that request this information.

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College transcripts

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Most people haven’t seen a copy of their academic transcripts in years. If that’s true for you, you may want to consider ordering a new copy from every university you attended. Some universities offer unofficial transcripts for free, and these are generally accepted by employers. Some companies will ask you to bring copies of your transcripts to an interview in order to substantiate that you have the degrees you claim on your resume.

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Government ID

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If you make it through the interview process and start a new job, you will be required to produce two forms of government identification in order to start your tax paperwork. While a driver’s license is sufficient as one form of ID, you’ll also need your social security card, birth certificate, or passport as a secondary form. If you don’t know where any of those things are, now’s a good time to order another copy—before you need them on short notice for a new job.

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Job hunting is a stressful process, and it can be made even more so when you encounter employer requests that you aren’t expecting. Keeping your personal records and documentation organized can help reduce some of the stress of the application process and interview process.

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To secure the interview and move on to the next step in the hiring process ensure you’re giving yourself the best competitive edge available by utilizing a professionally-developed resume and cover letter. It’s important to know that you’re competing against other candidates who are using professionally prepared documents and those candidates have a 77% chance of winning the interview over those who don’t utilize professionally-written resumes. Give yourself the competitive advantage you deserve today and start getting interviews now.

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Comments

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Posted by: kremie On: 4/5/2011 3:25:40 PM

You forgot to mention behind the scenes judgements by the employer of whether the candidate looks like them, talks like them, etc. These are still prominent in many HR depts.

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Posted by: John Bigler On: 4/6/2011 6:06:01 PM

Well, let us be frank. I am from an older school of thought. Even though there are greater risks in hiring companies to find honest employees, I find it a bit overboard to think it would take an hour to complete a test for a bank teller. I found most non college grads can work as a teller at a bank. Of course might be a big problem to have to train someone trying to make a living while going to school so they do not have to be a bank teller. Who would make that a career? That would be like I want to be a paper boy for the rest of my life. It dose not take an hour to see if a person can fit the job.

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Posted by: Yolanda Vidales On: 4/6/2011 6:58:26 PM

Regarding ID, the back of the I-9 form lists all the documents that anyone will need in case of hired, not before. If the person has one document in list A, does not need any other document, which includes the SS card. The employer cannot indicate what document(s) must be showed, and cannot ask for different or more than listed on the back of I-9 form, which is clear in what and how many.

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Posted by: Shelley Dempsey On: 4/6/2011 8:14:59 PM

Good to know. Appreciate the heads-up.

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Posted by: Debra Suber On: 4/7/2011 11:54:55 AM

I really appreciate the advice that is given on this website. I havn't had an interview in over 15yrs WOW THANKS

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Posted by: Pamela Jolley On: 4/8/2011 10:17:51 AM

I find when a prospective employer wants to do a credit checkm it is invasive. I am in a position that I have bad credit because I cannot find a job. Also they pull up workers' comp info. If you use the system, it is used against you as well. Employers don't want to hire if you have been on workers' comp.

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Posted by: K Perrin On: 4/8/2011 2:34:44 PM

I have a hard time with companies that use credit checks for a basis of a job offer. When someone is unemployed for any length of time their credit is going to suffer, usually through no fault of their own. So to be excluded because of a low credit score doesn't mean that you are not qualified to do the job, all it means is that your credit score is going to drop even further.

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Posted by: Robert Campbell On: 4/8/2011 4:11:38 PM

Times has changed now when employers are pre-screening items on an applicant's job application or resume; requiring selected applicants to take tests and bring their unoffical college transcripts to the initial job interview. You have to do what you got to do to GET HIRED.

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Posted by: Sinnie Maze On: 4/8/2011 8:05:41 PM

I thought that using a credit check was against the law now for employers. Good to know that they are still using it. I have been unemployed for 2 years. I need all the insight I can get to find a job

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Posted by: Harper On: 4/11/2011 6:58:46 PM

If you think age is not a factor in hiring, you are wrong. I have been unemployed for 2 years and have a degree and years of experience, but my hair was beautiful silver. I got no results so I now color my hair. I still encounter discrimination in this area.

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KEYWORDS: job assessments, city jobs, government jobs, retail jobs, banking jobs, military jobs, teaching jobs

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Retailers asking online job applicants for their ages?

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Apr 03 2011

 HOME OF JOB FEST 2011 -

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Retailers asking online job applicants for ages?

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Posted By: Staff Editor On: 4/03/2011 10:14:11 AM In: Diversity in the Workplace

There has been news that some large employers are asking applicants to disclose their age on their online applications.

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Supermarket Jobs - Grocery Jobs - Food Jobs

As if this job market hasn't been challenging enough for the over-50 workforce, now comes news that some large employers are asking applicants to disclose their age on their online applications.

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The Huffington Post reports that several large retailers, including The Home Depot, Kroger and Target, are asking jobseekers to state their date of birth on their forms. While the law does not forbid this, it could be an invitation to an age discrimination lawsuit.

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At least one of the retailers mentioned in the HuffPost story, Kroger, says it asks for applicants' birth dates "to ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing the employment of minors or establishing age requirements for certain tasks" and that hiring managers do not see the ages of applicants over 21. The others told the HuffPost that they use the information only to conduct background checks once candidates are hired.

Still, as several human resources professionals quoted in the story note, the practice leaves employers vulnerable to charges of age discrimination. Older workers, who already have a harder time finding work than younger workers in the current job market, are filing age discrimination complaints at a higher rate these days; the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says such complaints accounted for 24.4% of all employment discrimination complaints in fiscal 2009.

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Older workers seeking jobs in retail are responding by working around the requirement, filling in the birthdate boxes with zeroes. Others have resorted to subterfuge by lying about their birthdates. One job seeker quoted in the HuffPost story, Ruth Lyons, a florist who was laid off in the fall of 2008, said she kept getting passed over for interviews at one retailer in her area until she gave a later, fake birthdate on her application. Then she got called in, and her charm and personality got her the job on the spot.

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Which suggests that lying might be a good strategy for the older job seeker in a job market lousy with younger, cheaper workers. Ruth Lyons strategically lied her way to a new job; would you? Think about this for a minute and share your thoughts in the comments.

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By Sandy Smith

Sandy Smith is a veteran freelance writer, editor and public relations professional who lives in Philadelphia. Besides blogging for RetailGigs.com, he has written for numerous publications and websites, would be happy to do your resume, and is himself actively seeking career opportunities on Beyond.com. Check out his LinkedIn profile.

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Keywords: supermarket jobs, grocery jobs, food jobs, front end manager jobs, cashier jobs, supermarket manager jobs, grocery store manager jobs, deli jobs, bakery jobs, cafe jobs, retail jobs, retail manager jobs, retail cashier jobs

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

How Sales Jobs Build The World

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Mar 07 2011

A Service Of:

JobNewsRADIO.com

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How Sales Jobs Build The World

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Find Top Sales Job Keywords,

Sales Hiring Statistics And More ...

Sales Jobs

Sales - a transaction between two parties which includes the exchange of

valuable resources - drives all world economies,

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... now as it did thousands of

years ago,. Whether entry level or senior manager, the sales representative will

maintain an emphasis on acquiring and retaining broad based customer

relationships.

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One way to find a reliable, durable sale gig, is to use the right keywords when

you run a job search in a search engine or niche job bank. Saves time by

delivering relevent job postings, as opposes to scores of generic sales

positions. Take a look below at sales title job postings most often posted in the

last 30 days to major job boards:

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TOP POSTED SALES JOB OPENINGS

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Advertising Sales jobs

Agricultural Sales jobs

Biotechnical Equipment Sales Jobs

Cashier jobs

Chemical Sales Representative jobs

Computer Hardware Sales jobs

Counter Clerk jobs

Demonstrator jobs

Door-to-door Sales jobs

Financial Services Sales Agent jobs

Food Service Sales jobs

Instrument Sales jobs

Insurance Sales Agent jobs

Mechanical Equipment Sales Representative

Medical Sales jobs

Modeling jobs

Non-retail Sales Supervisor jobs

Parts Sales jobs

Pharmaceutical Sales jobs

Product Promoter jobs

Real Estate jobs

Retail Sales jobs

Retail Sales Supervisor jobs

Sales Engineer jobs

Sales Manager jobs

Software Sales jobs

Telecommunications jobs

Telemarketer jobs

Vendor jobs

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TOP SALES KEYWORD SEARCHES

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1. Sales jobs

2. Sales Manager jobs

3. Retail jobs

4. Pharmaceutical jobs

5. Pharmaceutical Sales jobs

6. Cashier jobs

7. Medical jobs

8. Outside Sales jobs

9. Software jobs

10. Food jobs

11. Inside Sales jobs

12. Sales Representative jobs

13. Account Manager jobs

14. Demonstrator jobs

15. Retail Sales jobs

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BASIC SALES JOB FUNCTIONS:

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1. Reaching sales goals as set by management

2. Develop customer base necessary to meet all sales forecasts and budgets.

3. Maintain high level of product and vendor knowledge.

4. Attend trade shows and association meetings as required.

5. Prospecting for new business, preparing/presenting proposals and

maintaining existing relationships.

6. Serves as point of contact for business customers issues

7. Weekly reporting and updates of sales

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Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

1. Positive attitude.

2. Strong interpersonal skills.

3. Ability to effectively manage time and prioritize multiple responsibilities.

4. Ability to deal with customers, vendors and all channels of distribution to

assess and analyze situations.

5. Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

6. Self motivated and ability to excel with minimum supervision.

7. Knowledge of internet and data connectivity products and services.

8. Good PC skills with proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint.

9. Ability to work well with customers and co-workers in a team environment.

10. Ability to write and present effective proposals

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RETAIL SALES

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To assist customers in finding and purchasing the required merchandise in a

retail environment. To encourage customers to purchase products.

Main Job Tasks and Responsibilities

■ greet customers

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■ find out the customer's needs

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■ recommend, select and help locate the right merchandise

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■ describe a product's features and benefits

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■ demonstrate use and operation of the product

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■ answer customer queries regarding the store and the merchandise

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■ provide information about warranties, manufacturing specifications, care and

maintenance of merchandise and delivery options

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■ provide information about financing available

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■ receive and process cash, check and charge/credit payments

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■ provide change and receipts

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■ bag or package purchases

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■ count money, sort charge slips and balance monies

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■ maintain sales records

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■ place special orders

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■ organize and process merchandise exchanges

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■ process repair or alteration of merchandise

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■ stay current with sales prices

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■ recognize and monitor security issues

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■ arrange and display merchandise

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■ keep merchandise area tidy

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■ take stock inventory

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■ requisition new stock

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Education and Experience

■ high school diploma or equivalent preferred

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■ knowledge of customer service principles and processes

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■ knowledge of sales principles

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■ relevant product knowledge and training

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■ experience in a retail, customer service or sales environment

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■ basic business administration knowledge

Key Competencies

■good communication skills

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■ customer service orientation

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■ patience

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■adaptability

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■initiative

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■persuasiveness

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■ stress tolerance

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■ high energy level

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■ integrity

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. Jobs in Sales & Sales Management

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If you are looking for some information about a specific type of job or are just

curious about other career paths, review the following positions and job titles to

help choose the right one for you.

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Advertising Sales Agents

Sell or solicit advertising, including graphic art, advertising space in

publications, custom made signs, or TV and radio advertising time. May obtain

leases for outdoor advertising sites or persuade retailer to use sales promotion

display items.

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Door-To-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers

Sell goods or services door-to-door or on the street.

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Parts Salespersons

Sell spare and replacement parts and equipment in repair shop or parts store.

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Retail Salespersons

Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a

retail establishment.

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Sales Engineers

Sell business goods or services, the selling of which requires a technical

background equivalent to a baccalaureate degree in engineering.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and

Scientific Products

Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses or groups of

individuals. Work requires substantial knowledge of items sold.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific

Products

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Account Sales jobs

Auctioneer jobs

Biotechnical Sales jobs

Customer Quotation jobs

E-Commerce Sale jobs

Multi Media Ad Sales jobs

Sr. Account Manager jobs

Sr. Sales Consultant jobs

Sr. Sales Executive jobs

Sr. Sales Representative

Trade Show Sales jobs

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GOOD LUCK IN YOUR SALES JOB SEARCH!!!

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Monster Employment Index - FEBRUARY from JANUARY

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Mar 03 2011

A Service Of:

JobNewsRADIO

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Monster Employment Index

Rises in February from January; Year-Over-Year

Growth Continues to Remain Positive

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Monster Job Growth Index

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February 2011 Index Highlights:

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• Annual growth rate eases to 4 percent, yet remains above year-earlier levels while Index rises 7

points (6 percent) month-over-month

• All 28 metro markets record positive annual growth in February

• Positive consumer-spending trends generate uptick in retail sector

• Public administration weighs down overall Index; sector’s annual declines slide to 25 percent,

reaching a new low in the Index

The Monster Employment Index is a monthly gauge of U.S. online job demand based on a real-time review of

millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large representative selection of corporate career Web sites

and job boards, including Monster.com®.

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“Sustained expansionary trends in private sector hiring coupled with growing consumer confidence have led to

positive YoY growth in the Index” said Jesse Harriott, senior vice president and chief knowledge officer at Monster

Worldwide. “Although Index growth has eased since the early summer peak of 2010 due in part to a decline in

public sector activity, it has been positive year-over-year since February 2010 as employers continue to maintain a

measured approach to growth.”

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Industry Year-over-year Trends:

10 of the 20 industries monitored

by the Index showed positive

annual growth trends.

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• Utilities (up 17 percent) was amongst the top-moving sectors in February, possibly due to emergence of new

jobs across infrastructure and back-office operations as employers implement new technologies

• Retail Trade (up 15 percent) rose on a monthly basis, displaying sector recruitment trends similar to those

of the pre-recessionary period

• Professional, scientific, and technical services (up 9 percent) edged up in the Index to the same degree

as historically seen at this time of year, suggesting little change in demand conditions after accounting for

seasonal patterns

• Finance and insurance (down 8 percent) eased further indicating possible hiring stagnation for a variety of

clerical and support roles, following a more active pace of job creation in 2010

• Public administration (down 25 percent) registered the steepest annual decline, with further reduction in

government jobs at the federal and local levels

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Top Growth Industries

Year-over-year Growth Feb 10 - Feb 11 % Growth Y-o-y

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Mining, Quarrying, Oil and Gas

Extraction 148 234 58%

Utilities 110 129 17%

Other Services 162 186 15%

Retail Trade 116 133 15%

Transportation and Warehousing 131 148 13%

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Lowest Growth Industries

Year-over-year Growth Feb 10 - Feb 11 % Growth Y-o-y

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Management of Companies and

Enterprises 111 101 -9%

Accommodation and Food Services 94 83 -12%

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and

Hunting 211 182 -14%

Real Estate, Rental and Leasing 57 49 -14%

Public Administration 190 142 -25%

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Occupation Year-over-year Trends:

Annual online demand for workers

rose in 15 of the 23 occupational

categories in February.

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• Business and financial operations (up 11 percent) and architecture and engineering (up 10 percent)

recorded robust year-over-year growth

• Healthcare support (up 13 percent) gained the most momentum with annual growth accelerating from 10 percent

in January

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Top Growth Occupations

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Installation, Maintenance, and

Repair 124 153 23%

Arts, Design, Entertainment,

Sports and Media 77 92 19%

Personal Care and Service 53 63 19%

Transportation and Material

Moving 84 96 14%

Healthcare Support 175 198 13%

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Lowest Growth Occupations

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Legal 101 96 -5%

Life, Physical, and Social Science 123 111 -10%

Food Preparation and Serving 98 88 -10%

Farming, Fishing, and Forestry 196 171 -13%

Protective Service 83 58 -30%

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Geographic year-over-year Trends:

All 28 metro markets recorded positive

annual growth in February

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• Detroit (up 46 percent) and Philadelphia (up 35 percent) continued to remain among top growth

markets.

• San Diego (up 18 percent) recorded accelerated long term growth with increasing online job demand

for production, construction and office/administrative support occupations

• Dallas (up 8 percent) eased notably with reduced demand for healthcare practitioners and technical

occupations, and transportation and material moving

• Among the 50 states and the District, 38 registered annual increases in online job demand.

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Top Growth Metro Markets

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Detroit 70 102 46%

Philadelphia 43 58 35%

Cleveland 80 102 28%

Orlando 44 56 27%

Minneapolis 78 99 27%

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Lowest Growth Metro Markets

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Miami 69 78 13%

Kansas City 75 84 12%

Dallas 95 103 8%

Washington, D.C. 46 48 4%

Baltimore 44 45 2%

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By Industry - 2010 2011

Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb-11

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Agriculture, Forestry,

Fishing and Hunting 211 208 205 195 195 196 188 177 178 165 168 177 182

Mining, Quarrying and Oil

and Gas Extraction 148 149 169 176 178 182 189 191 197 199 204 211 234

Utilities 110 108 117 121 121 121 132 141 137 131 136 122 129

Construction 165 176 195 197 200 195 193 194 191 194 174 165 173

Manufacturing 83 84 91 91 91 93 93 93 92 91 88 85 88

Wholesale Trade 127 129 133 134 134 134 136 137 139 142 139 138 143

Retail Trade 116 124 137 140 135 135 143 141 145 152 138 132 133

Transportation and

Warehousing 131 138 149 150 157 160 155 154 162 161 158 143 148

Information 81 79 77 77 80 81 80 80 82 81 79 76 79

Finance and Insurance 51 52 53 53 52 52 53 52 53 50 47 46 47

Real Estate and Rental and

Leasing 57 63 62 55 60 57 55 55 60 59 56 47 49

Professional, Scientific, and

Technical Services 54 53 56 57 59 59 58 59 59 58 56 56 59

Management of Companies

and Enterprises 111 111 117 111 122 122 118 117 106 109 103 96 101

Administrative, Support,

Waste Management,

Remediation Services 51 51 54 54 55 56 55 55 55 54 50 48 50

Educational Services 81 82 89 91 91 94 92 87 90 90 86 77 80

Healthcare and Social

Assistance 84 86 91 102 108 107 107 110 107 104 99 92 94

Arts, Entertainment, and

Recreation 35 37 40 41 42 42 41 41 41 39 37 35 35

Accommodation and Food

Services 94 95 104 99 113 108 111 105 99 102 99 79 83

Other Services 162 161 175 183 188 183 183 188 187 178 166 166 186

Public Administration 190 182 183 186 193 198 190 204 213 189 166 142 142

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By Occupation

2010 2011

Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

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Management 133 139 147 144 152 148 144 144 136 137 130 123 131

Business and Financial

Operations 134 132 145 148 151 146 145 148 147 148 153 140 149

Computer and Mathematical 95 94 98 97 102 101 101 102 103 103 99 98 103

Architecture and

Engineering 84 84 88 84 89 90 88 88 86 85 82 87 92

Life, Physical, and Social

Science 123 124 127 121 130 132 123 119 116 113 111 107 111

Community and Social

Services 174 160 179 185 191 187 188 196 188 182 183 176 190

Legal 101 93 98 105 111 111 116 115 117 113 97 87 96

Education, Training, and

Library 114 116 125 130 132 134 130 123 126 125 120 108 113

Arts, Design, Entertainment,

Sports, and Media 77 84 91 94 96 96 95 95 93 92 86 89 92

Healthcare Practitioners and

Technical 136 139 145 159 159 159 161 161 163 159 151 139 142

Healthcare Support 175 166 178 180 201 205 195 209 205 202 198 192 198

Protective Service 83 71 78 85 85 77 83 90 89 83 60 55 58

Food Preparation and

Serving Related 98 107 116 108 119 118 115 110 101 94 94 79 88

Building, Grounds Cleaning,

Maintenance 106 110 117 116 122 118 115 110 116 114 96 94 105

Personal Care and Service 53 53 62 54 59 57 53 48 45 43 39 51 63

Sales and Related 90 90 94 93 93 91 91 90 91 94 90 85 91

Office and Administrative

Support 95 98 101 102 104 106 103 105 104 101 92 90 93

Farming, Fishing, and

Forestry 196 203 191 182 176 175 169 162 162 151 149 162 171

Construction and Extraction 97 103 114 115 116 115 115 116 114 115 105 100 106

Installation, Maintenance,

and Repair 124 125 130 134 134 135 140 144 146 138 135 138 153

Production 108 108 117 117 117 121 121 122 121 120 113 113 117

Transportation and Material

Moving 84 88 95 96 100 103 100 99 105 104 102 91 96

Military Specific 148 159 152 153 155 150 149 160 154 146 140 137 141

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By Local Market

2010 2011

Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

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Atlanta 78 84 90 88 93 90 91 92 89 92 88 77 91

Baltimore 44 46 51 49 54 51 50 53 51 50 48 40 45

Boston 62 66 78 79 81 77 78 81 82 79 74 64 75

Chicago 66 68 76 74 78 76 78 82 82 81 78 71 82

Cincinnati 65 69 73 75 84 77 78 83 83 78 75 67 81

Cleveland 80 88 91 91 100 95 99 99 103 103 100 89 102

Dallas 95 99 101 103 105 100 104 106 105 104 101 94 103

Denver 86 89 94 96 100 100 103 102 103 101 95 91 100

Detroit 70 72 78 79 91 89 93 97 99 101 91 86 102

Houston 104 107 111 114 118 115 117 120 117 116 112 106 121

Indianapolis 76 78 82 82 92 87 90 89 91 89 86 79 90

Kansas City 75 79 86 87 97 88 94 97 94 92 84 74 84

Los Angeles 58 61 67 67 69 66 67 69 69 69 64 59 68

Miami 69 72 76 75 78 73 73 74 76 76 74 68 78

Minneapolis 78 84 85 86 91 86 90 95 96 98 98 89 99

New York City 70 73 82 82 84 83 83 84 85 83 79 71 80

Orlando 44 50 50 53 60 54 54 56 55 58 54 46 56

Philadelphia 43 45 54 56 57 58 59 63 63 65 59 50 58

Phoenix 65 67 70 70 71 69 71 72 74 75 71 66 74

Pittsburgh 126 131 136 141 152 142 144 151 149 148 141 126 146

Portland 71 79 84 88 97 90 93 89 95 92 83 74 89

Sacramento 62 68 70 71 78 74 75 75 76 74 71 68 77

San Diego 65 69 71 70 74 71 71 72 73 70 67 65 77

San Francisco 66 68 73 73 76 75 76 76 77 76 73 68 76

Seattle 93 99 104 105 111 108 107 108 108 106 102 100 108

St. Louis 95 99 102 104 116 109 111 114 113 116 110 98 111

Tampa 71 73 77 77 87 78 80 82 82 82 80 75 83

Washington, D.C. 46 48 55 54 58 51 53 54 53 52 49 41 48

.

.

By Region

2010 2011

Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

.

New England 112 112 124 124 130 126 122 125 123 123 117 110 117

Mid-Atlantic 114 117 130 129 133 132 130 130 128 122 117 110 115

East North Central 111 112 119 120 127 125 124 125 124 125 122 117 122

West North Central 124 121 128 130 141 138 137 139 141 142 140 128 136

South Atlantic 117 119 128 127 134 130 128 128 125 126 121 115 121

East South Central 132 130 132 135 142 140 136 140 138 136 134 125 134

West South Central 200 200 202 204 216 210 211 214 205 201 194 182 195

Mountain 124 123 129 132 137 136 134 142 142 141 135 120 128

Pacific 102 105 113 114 119 117 115 114 112 111 106 106 111

..................................................................

..................................................................

keywords: retail jobs, restaurant jobs, customer service jobs, administration jobs

healthcare jobs, nursing jobs, aide jobs, teaching jobs, training jobs, sales jobs,

engineer jobs, government jobs, non-profit jobs, education jobs, manager jobs,

business management jobs, manufacturing jobs, logistics jobs

Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

10 Job Interview Questions To Ask

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 28 2011

JobNewsRADIO.com Job Search Resources

.

10 Job Interview Questions

To Ask - IF YOU WANT THE JOB!

Don't Be Caught With Your Job Interview Skills Down

Author Ken Suddheim

AUTHOR KEN SUNDHEIM

Posted By: Ken Sundheim In: Entry Level and College Grads

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.

When interviewing at any level ... and, especially entry-level, there are certain questions you can ask that will help you stand out from the crowd. Following these rules will boost your value on the open job market and result in more offers and, best of yet, less rejections.

When interviewing at any level and, especially entry-level, there are certain questions you can ask that will help you stand out from the crowd. Following these rules will boost your value on the open job market and result in more offers and, best of yet, less rejections.

......

Before you read this, always remember that there is a direct relationship

between the quality of questions that you ask and

the amount of research you've done on the company

in which you are interviewing with.

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1. "I saw that your CEO came from (college, industry and location), your CFO came from here (college, industry and location) and your COO has something completely different, what types of personality traits make people so successful at this organization?"

Believe it or not, countless studies at the nation's most prestigious universities have done analysis on hundreds upon hundreds of executives and none share all of the 6 or 7 common traits they were looking for. So, don't expect the CFO to be a numbers guy as the presumption would look awful foolish if he was the company's party animal.

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The Closing Technique That Wins, Gets High Job Offers And Turns Heads

2. "I can assure you that prior to leaving this interview, I know that this is the type of position I want because of x, y and z. What else can I do to make you feel more comfortable with bringing me on Company's XYZ team?"

.

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People Love Speaking About Themselves:

3. "Please, don't misconstrue this as prying, however do you mind me asking a little bit about you and, essentially how did you get into this business?"

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As a matter of fact, listening is one of the best forms of persuasive communication. If you have the ability to interject, ask how big marlin are. If you feel uncomfortable asking a potential obvious and elementary inquiry, say

"This may be common knowledge, but..."

Setting Up The Lob To Give You Match Point Slam

4. "As a whole, what facets of the job do the other employees my age most enjoy? How much of their time is spent is doing so? What don't they enjoy?"

- Now, tell them how this is great and even more intriguing because, your skill sets are the ones he or she just listed.

.

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Maintaining and Building Relationships 101

5. "If for reason, I left the office and you found somebody who was a perfect, perfect match and decided to hire the person, can I keep this relationship active with a quick email every few months?"

If the person is smart, they will be impressed.

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If Asked What You Are Looking For, Ask This Question Right Back

6. "Would what I'm looking for is a company that is looking for somebody like me count as an answer? The reason I say so is that I can't tell you what type of field I want to go into at this age.

However, I can tell you that I want to be close to others who are young, intelligent, vibrant, passionate about becoming better and those who don't want to dump their load of work on others."

.

.

Getting Them To Loosen Up On Compensation With A Sentence

7. "What is the range that you've budgeted for this particular role?"

Most of the time, they will be impressed by a few other questions that they won't want to risk loosing you for $3,000. Take the firm salary out of the equation.

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You Should Know This Beforehand From Research, But Not Bad To Have In Back Pocket

8. "From my research, I have these guys as your main competitors (come w/ website print outs). Am I on point? Do you mind one more question? What are your strategic advantages and market positions?"

.

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Another Closing Tactic - Getting Commitment From The Other Side

9. "I would love to type up the notes that I took during today's meeting so I am able to gather my thoughts and wait accordingly. Is Monday afternoon around 3:30ish a good time to send the email? After that, I'll just wait for your response."

Here's the fun part, if you pick 3:30, there is more of a chance of the person taking a few minute break and having a few minutes to potentially call you. Be prompt, concise, but thorough in your analysis. Remember, presumptions kill all persuasion efforts and can turn a meeting or hiring cycle right against you.

.

.

Find Out Timeline For Hire, But Not Directly

10. "What situation currently arises and making the need for this position?"

Let them say how they are bogged down with work and in your thank you email, reiterate how you would like to take some of that work from them.

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.

Situations You May Run Into With Questions

If you're interviewing with people who do not know what they are doing, they are not going to like questions because they think your job, as a recent college graduate is to site there and beg for the job.

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If you find yourself at a good company and you're in front of one of these types of people, keep a zipper. However, the more seasoned decision makers will not only welcome these inquiries, but will be impressed by them.

GOOD LUCK IN YOUR JOB SEARCH!

Keywords: retail jobs, it jobs, administrative jobs, restaurant jobs, accounting jobs, finance jobs, engineering jobs, sales jobs, business management jobs, job interview help, job search, how to set a job interview

Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Your Next Job Could be a Tweet Away

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 12 2011

JobNewsRadio

.............

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Your Next Job Could be a Tweet Away

.

.

. Posted By: Nimish Thakkar In: Networking

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Social Media Job Search

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From tweeting about office gossip ... to discussing dating nightmares, social media has literally redefined the way we communicate about our personal and professional lives. As a career coach and professional resume writer, I am witnessing an emerging trend: On the employment front, both job seekers and hiring managers are embracing social media with open arms. In fact, the utilization of social media is so prevalent, the very term “job search” is now shedding its legacy status and is being upgraded to “job connect” instead.

Employment dynamics have changed

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As of July 2010, the unemployment rate touched nearly 9.5% and the number of unemployed individuals now peaks at around 14.6 million. What’s worse? The average workweek is approximately 34.1 hours, leaving many candidates the option to pursue a second job. With so many qualified professionals looking for work, the competition is undeniably intense.

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“Connections” is the success mantra in today’s hyper-competitive landscape, and job seekers need to spend more time networking with key decision makers and hiring managers. While both employers and employees appear to be retaining job boards and other traditional recruitment strategies, social media appears to serve as a valuable addition to prevalent tools.

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From an employer’s perspective, Dale DeSteno, a Direct Hire Recruiter with Kelly Services, considers social media an attractive proposition, primarily because of the potential “viral effect it could generate.”

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Online networking connects people

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Online networking can help you penetrate otherwise impregnable corporate fortresses and make actual contact with a hiring manager, without having to deal with the embarrassment of getting past gatekeepers and infamous switchboard operators. If you wanted to work at XYZ Company, for example, consider searching LinkedIn contacts. For well-networked professionals, it wouldn’t be unusual to find a connection that may be just a few degrees away. Why just LinkedIn? Even Facebook and other social networking forums may help you connect with an important decision maker or recruiter at your dream company.

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Recruiters regularly mine LinkedIn to find potential hires and fulfill job orders. “I have had great luck with meeting candidates (and even clients) using LinkedIn,” says Dale DeSteno.

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Apart from the ability to search candidates, LinkedIn allows professionals and peers to provide valuable recommendation and endorsements.

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Establish your brand; blog your way to a job

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Want to be even more proactive? Consider browsing through top-ranked blogs in your profession. In addition to niche job postings, you may be able to network with a key decision maker. Nick, a savvy networker, does just that. It was Nick’s regular practice to congratulate authors and provide valuable feedback and insights. This simple practice not only allowed him to snowball his network, but also empowered him with access to promising leads that are normally at the disposal of industry-recognized authors.

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If you are an expert within your niche, consider writing about your profession. Blog posts, Twitter updates, Facebook posts, LinkedIn updates -- all of these are wonderful tools to create and disseminate information to a large audience.

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The advantage of creating and distributing unique content is that there is always a possibility of generating viral publicity through forwarded posts. The strategy provides valuable opportunities to establish one’s brand as an expert and reach the desks of otherwise hard-to-reach senior executives.

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Leverage multimedia to make your job search interactive

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The rising popularity of YouTube has encouraged many job seekers to post video resumes and short presentations. With just one click, hiring managers can review these video resumes and correlate the paper resume with an actual person. The trend seems to be catching up, especially amongst technology-savvy job seekers.

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Kathy Jegen, an HR professional, launched an aggressive job search campaign using her website (KathyJegen.com), social media, and a YouTube video. Speaking of her experience, Ms. Jegen says, “Utilizing my methods I took my job search from no response to my resume (using traditional job search boards), to up to 10 requests a day for my resume. I now have a contract opportunity that requires government clearance and will begin this contract position when I get official clearance. I will have the opportunity to interview for a position that will lead to a VP role in two years.”

The benefits of social media certainly stand out, but like any other high visibility medium, it does call for some discipline and policing. Given the public reach and accessibility of social media, it is not unusual for hiring managers to find online postings, videos, and pictures that could jeopardize your career success.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

SHOULD YOU OUT YOURSELF ON YOUR RESUME

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Feb 07 2011

JobNewsRADIO

/////////////////////////////

GAY OR LESBIAN?

OUT YOURSELF ON RESUME .

Should you out yourself

on your resume?

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.

.

Posted By: Staff Editor On: 1/13/2011 1:57:35 PM In: Diversity in the Workplace

www.businessworkforceblog.com

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. The law forbids discrimination ... on the basis of race, age and sex no matter where you are, but sexual orientation is another matter. As of now, only 21 states and the District of Columbia have laws on the books banning discrimination in employment on the basis of sexual orientation; 13 of those states and the District also outlaw employment discrimination based on gender identity or expression.

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Most of these states are in the Northeast and on the Pacific Coast, but two clusters of states - one in the upper Central Plains (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin) and one in the Rocky Mountain region (Colorado and New Mexico) - also have enacted such laws.

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If you're a resident of one of the other 29 states -- your blogger, a Pennsylvanian, is one such person -- you may not be completely out of luck, for several hundred counties and cities have also enacted local ordinances protecting lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and (in some cases) transgendered individuals from discrimination in the workplace. For instance, in Pennsylvania, both of the state's largest counties (Philadelphia and Allegheny) and cities (Philadelphia and Pittsburgh) have such ordinances on their books, as do a number of other counties, cities, boroughs and townships in the state. You should check with your county court house or municipal government to see whether such laws exist where you live.

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And if you work for the Federal government, provisions of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 have been interpreted to prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. Even if you are fortunate enough to live or work in any of these situations, the question of coming out on your resume remains a live one.

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Some argue that indicating your orientation in some fashion on your resume will give you a leg up with employers that seek diverse workforces. It would also act as an effective screen for homophobic employers -- which is one reason why others argue that you should downplay anything that might lead an employer to conclude that you are an LGBT individual. In today's environment, where job seekers still way outnumber available jobs, doing something that might automatically shut you out of some of those jobs should be carefully weighed first.

.

My take on the subject is this: If the thing that outs you on your resume also fits in well with your career goals and capabilities, you should include it if you live in an area where antidiscrimination laws exist. If you don't, you probably shouldn't.

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.

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By Sandy Smith

Sandy Smith is an award-winning writer and editor who has spent most of his career in public relations and corporate communications. His work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia CityPaper, PGN, and a number of Web sites. Philly-area residents may also recognize him as "MarketStEl" of discussion-board fame.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

How To Recognize And Answer “Secret” Illegal Job interview Questions

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 19 2011

How To Know And Answer “Secret”

Illegal Job Interview Questions

.

..................... Illegal Job Interview Questions

WHEN YOU ARE IN THE JOB INTERVIEW HOT SEAT

.

.

By Melissa Kennedy

Posted On: 1/19/2011 4:25:20 PM In: Diversity in the Workplace

http://jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/how-to-answer-the-secret-illegal-interview-5021-article.html

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.

When you are being interviewed by a potential employer ..., there are several types of interview questions that are illegal for them to ask. These questions include asking how old you are, your marital status, if you have children, your religion, your political affiliations, disabilities and racial background. These questions are prohibited by both federal and state laws, because not hiring someone based on the answers to these questions is discriminatory.

.

Most people who work in Human Resources, or who are often in charge of interviewing candidates are well aware of this restriction, and will be sure not to ask these types of questions. But, just because they don't ask these questions doesn't mean that they don't have them. This is where the “secret” illegal question comes in, because it is often only asked in the interviewers mind. And, since it isn't expressed, you don't have a chance to respond to it.

.

Frequently, this comes into play when you can't hide the answers to some of these questions that can't be asked. Some examples would be, if you are physically challenged, over 50, are a member of an ethnic minority, or your resume makes it clear that you are a single mom returning to the workplace. While the interviewer can't specifically address any of these factors, they may be taking them into consideration and asking questions about it to themselves. They may wonder if your disability will limit your work abilities and if you have the physical strength to handle a long work day, or they may ask themselves if you family obligations will take valuable time away from you work responsibilities. So, when you are in this sort of situation, how is the best way to deal with it?

.

Basically, you have two choices. And, this is where doing a little bit of research on the company and the corporate culture can really help. Is the culture open minded and innovative? Are they a very formal company that prides themselves on being traditional? By finding out who they are as a company, you can get a better idea of what “secret” questions they may be asking and it can help you decide which way to choose.

.

Option 1:

.

Address your obvious situation directly. If you have a visible physical disability, mention it and let them know that your physical challenges don't interfere with your ability to perform the job. If you are a mom who is returning to the workplace, when the interviewer asks why you are looking for a job now, you can tell them that your children are older now and you feel confident that it is the right time to start devoting more of yourself to your career. By addressing the situation head on, you can answer the questions they may have without them having to ask. The truth is that just because they can't ask the question, doesn't mean they don't have any, and more than likely, they will come up with their own answers, so you might as well help them out. On the other hand, because the interviewer knows that these questions aren't allowed, by talking about your situation openly, you may make them feel uncomfortable, and it is possible that they weren't even concerned about the issue until you brought it up.

.

.

Option 2:

.

Address any of these concerns indirectly. Think about what question the interviewer may be asking themselves and offer plenty of counterbalancing information to reassure them about your abilities. The key to this option is to try to understand the intent of the question. For example, if you are over 50 and you think that the interviewer may be concerned that you aren't going to be able to pick up new skills and training easily, you can highlight skills and experience that show your willingness to learn new things and your openness to adapting to new technologies. This will reassure the interviewer that your age isn't a problem in the areas he may be doubtful about. No matter what your particular situation is, it is important to think about which of your key abilities demonstrates that you are capable of performing the job and hit them hard, leaving no doubt that you are a great candidate for the job. Be sure though, to not come across as defensive about yourself or to in any way imply that the interviewer has unspoken, discriminatory questions.

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Whichever option you chose, the key is to attempt to understand what sort of ideas and preconceptions an interviewer might have about you. One way to find out is to ask yourself what sort of concerns you would have, if you were hiring for this position and were interviewing yourself. This should give you an idea of what concerns they might have and give you an idea of which of your strengths, accomplishments and abilities you should stress in order to strongly counterbalance any unspoken concerns about your ability to be a good fit for the company and the position.

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By Melissa Kennedy - Melissa is a 9 year blog veteran and a freelance writer helping others find the job of their dreams.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Limited Time - FREE - JOB SEARCH MAGAZINE- PDF EDITION

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 12 2011

-- SETTING JOB INTERVIEWS NOW!

JOB SEARCH MAGAZINE

6-Million JOB SEEKER SUBSCRIBERS ... Meet ...

2-MILLION - Employers, Staffing, Temp and Recruiting Firms

.

FREE PDF EDITION - OR ONLINE ACCESS ($25 VALUE)

NOW AVAILABLE HERE - (No log-in or card required)

Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Employment Index Up 13% Year over Year

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 06 2011

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Monster Index

Monster Employment Index Up

13% Year over Year in December

Marking 11th Consecutive Month of Growth

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.

December 2010 Index Highlights:

• Eleventh consecutive month of positive annual growth rate - stable at 13 percent in December

• Index edges down four points (3 percent) in December on monthly basis, generally meeting seasonal precedent for the end-of-quarter, end-of-year period

• Mining and utilities lead all sectors in annual growth while wholesale trade and transportation also trend higher

• Business and financial operations exhibits notable expansion in 2010, with improved online recruitment trends for accounting and financial professionals

• All 28 metro markets recorded positive annual growth in December

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search Resources

JOB INTERVIEW “TELLS” SOME EMPLOYERS USE AGAINST YOU

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Jan 01 2011

JobNewsRADIO.com

WELCOME TO 2011

THE JobDOG ANSWERS JOB SEARCH QUESTIONS

JOB INTERVIEW “TELLS”

SOME EMPLOYERS USE AGAINST YOU

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.

Recently a Director-level business manager complained to me that he just learned he was knocked out of the hiring process with a major retailer because he wasn’t “animated” enough in his job interview. Being a poker player, he asked me what other job interview “tells” he may be missing.

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Having conducted thousands of job interviews myself, and been involved with tens-of-thousands more, as a recruit manager dealing simultaneously with multiple national employer clients with ongoing appetites to hire at all levels, the consensus from those involved is that, generally speaking, in the first two minutes after an initial meeting with a job applicant, the applicant transmits several lasting impressions to the job interviewer. Impressions that go to the heart of how appropriate a job applicant may be for filling the job at hand. Remembering that the job interviewer is often the person who decides whom gets moved forward, or hired, job candidates could strive to make those first-impressions workplace related positive memories. Or at least be able to recognize what you may be saying wordlessly through your “tells.”

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Unfortunately, for most of us, in a job interview, many tend to project a faux-passive demeanor, a hyper-cooperative attitude; one that is at times attentive, maybe a little nervous, or mildly apprehensive, possibly even tinged with a bit of anxiety, for some. Those attributes leak through any positive persona we present at a job interview, and catch attention of the job interviewer. In that way, one or more less-than-positive personal habit or behavior, ones we’d rather not share openly, are sometimes revealed to the job interviewer.

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Such “tells” are easy to identify, which is why so many seasoned job interviewers look for them. Some of those behaviors are presented below. Recognize them for what they are – potential deal killers – work to edit such habits from your job interview repertoire. Not because I suggest it, but because job interviewers and hiring-agents of various flavors notice them, and not always in a good way.

To be clear, I’m not speaking of obvious and stupid and outrageous behavior, like showing up to a job interview drunk, or high on a drug – legal or not; or wearing inappropriately revealing or too-casual clothing; or being argumentative or in a foul or unkind frame of mind, or chewing gum, highlighting a tattoo or piercing, or tapping fingers or feet or pens, or in need of a bath or a toothbrush. No, those behaviors are easy to recognize. I speak here of more subtle “tells,” as a poker-player might call them.

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And how high are the stakes for you in your job search?

.

For instance, one of the top “tells” that job interviewers look for is a lack of genuine common politeness or good manners. Or worse, feigned, or faked sincerity of politeness or good manners. Hiring agents wonder how sincere could be the motives of a person who would fake politeness.

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Next is the “head in hand” pose; whether awaiting the job interview to start, or in the job interview itself, to do so suggests a message of boredom or fatigue when you rest or touch your head to your hand to relax your neck muscles or try to seem inquisitive or thoughtful. Job interviewers often look for that behavior and take it as a sign that you are less interested in the job than you lead them to believe. Or that your mind is elsewhere. Don’t leave the job interviewer with those impressions. Maintain an attentive mind and posture throughout the job interview.

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The third most common job interview “tell” is lack of engagement with the job interviewer; usually accompanied by near-zero eye-to-eye contact with the job interviewer, and shy handshake, and possibly a short self-introduction, delivered with little to no smile or much enthusiasm – remember, this usually happens in the first two-minutes of meeting, so most applicants are distracted by the process at hand, that’s when “tells” leak through into a public domain.

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As simple as this may sound, if you believe you may be performing this two-minute “tell,” try taking a few opportunities to introduce yourself to several random people prior to a job interview, like your mailman, or a café manager, or neighbor. Just look them in the eye, hold out your hand and smile as you introduce yourself. Don’t laugh at this suggestion. It is an easy and valuable, and proven, way for job candidates at all levels to upgrade job interview skills; from CFOs to entry-level retail hires, I’ve seen this technique used successfully.

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The fourth offending job interview “tell” is mild disarray, atypical disorder, possible misalignment of practical logic, as it regards a particular job applicant. Clothes noticeably unmatched, maybe not pressed or even fresh, un-kept hair – but trained and seemingly successful with other employers; messy job application without all sections filled, professional documents overtly simplified and generic, or just the reverse, with documents unnecessarily complicated - like resume and job references; or not following prescribed recruitment or pre-employment processes, as in changed from the norm; oddball communications with hiring contacts involved – all speak to a sense of a hiring mis-match.

Such behavior doesn’t prove a person cannot perform workplace duties admirably. It only suggests that such individuals require a thorough analysis by decision makers, to confirm appropriateness to the workplace culture and longevity. Too often, for such candidates, added scrutiny causes untimely delays or ends the job interview process early, while other less square-peg-in-a-round-hole-applicants move forward. Is it fair? Probably not. But high-volume employers – in point of fact, employers of any kind - can legally and rationally react accordingly, when pursuing such job candidate attributes. Attributes which often prove to be counter-productive to the hiring process - a time waster, as in the end many such job candidates fail to match the same H.R. expectations as those who successfully circumvent the hiring process.

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If you believe that you are not sending such subtle mixed messages during your job interviews, it’s time to reconsider your basic belief-system, as it regards job search. The advice here is that you try and discover your “tells” before the next job interviewer does it for you.

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Arrrfff … arrrfff! - the JobDOG

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

FOLLOW UP ON A JOB INTERVIEW?

Posted by Mark Baber
Dec 15 2010

JobNewsRADIO.com

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JOB INTERVIEW HELP

Follow up on a Job interview?

.

- JOB SEEKER QUESTION:

.

I recently applied for a job at the local dollar store. About a month later, I was there buying things. The boss, (who is an acquaintance of mine) asked if I wanted to go for an interview the next day. I said of course!

So, she said she would call me that day and tell me what time she would like me to come in the following day. I assume she got very busy, because she didn't call. So, the next morning, I called as soon as they opened and asked when she would like me to come in. She said 1:30.

I went in that afternoon. I suppose the interview went well, I have never done an interview before. She seemed happy and I think I answered everything correctly.

She told me she would let whoever know the next day who got the position. (She is giving 2 part time positions.)

So, I really want this job but I'm not sure how I should go about this.

Should I call her and ask her about her decision, since she forgot to call last time? Or should I just wait? I want to show that I really want this job and I'm excited about it, but I don't want to be a bother.

If I do call, what should I say? I'm thinking something along the lines of "Thanks for taking time to interview me, I don't mean to bother you, but I'm really excited and I'm wondering if you have made a decision on the job?"

Any advice helps. Thanks.

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ANSWER:

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From: - Mark Baber, Senior Placement Specialist

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This was your first job interview, you were unprepared. Most employers make their decisions for such part-time jobs with relative promptness. That doesn't mean they are not interested in you. And it doesn't mean you won't get the job, if you really want that particular job.

My advice is that you not make the dollar store your only job choice, though still pursue it, if that's what you want. There are likely other retail jobs available in your same area that offer part-time jobs. Over 70% of part-time jobs are not posted to web sites and newspapers. Meaning this, there are probably other jobs available that you may find are more eager to hire you.

Remember the following when you go to your next job interview: All employers want you to talk about how well you understand and can perform the job they will hire you for. In your next interview, bring along a list of duties you can already perform to their benefit, put them on your resume; in other words, when you speak in your next job interview, tell them you want the job, tell them what you already know about how to perform that job, and how you will exceed their expectations for that job, if you are hired. Do that in the job interview, as a preparation to your job interview follow-up.

To follow-up - which is the primary question herein - be assertive, honest, enthusiastic, let the employer know you will be following-up the job interview, and you say that in the initial job interview - don't wait to say you want the job - and tell them exactly when (no more than a couple days for a part-time job) and how you will get back with them to check on your results, then do it, make the call or drop by to check personally with the hiring agent exactly as you say you will.

Actions-speak-louder-than-words. Seeing your dedication to being on time for the interview, being prepared for the job interview, and offering additional documents and comments that assure the hiring agent that you can perform some duties now, and can be trained on others in short time - you prove to the hiring agent that you are the most prepared and motivated job candidate they have seen. Say it all again when you do your job interview follow-up.

Good luck in your job search!

http://www.JobNewsRADIO.com

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

THE JOB SEARCH SHOW - HIRING SECRETS REVEALED

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 08 2010

LEARN HOW TO GET HIRED SMART & FAST  

DON'T LEAVE YOUR JOB SEARCH RESULTS TO CHANCE

. CLICK HERE FOR EXPERT ADVICE

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

4 WAYS TO BEAT THE HIGH COST OF YOUR JOB SEARCH

Posted by Mark Baber
Dec 08 2010

.

4 WAYS TO BEAT THE HIGH COST

OF YOUR JOB SEARCH

AND STILL GET HIRED

December 8, 2010 - New York, NY -

By Mark Baber, for JobNewsRADIO.com

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Unless a job-seeker is using a close-network of associates, most individuals implementing a job-search require multiple tools in their job-search tool-chest, many of which have a price-tag attached.

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Tools most people require to perform a guided and successful job search, include several customized professional resumes to match specific employers you plan to impress; workplace references professionally prepared and focused and also customized to address specific candidate strengths/weaknesses; many applicants benefit from including with their resume and other hiring documents, depending upon your industry - third-party background or credit checks, or both; a computer on-which to organize and archive and research possible employers and job search documents and to have software to track each company with which you submit your resume; not to mention the requirement to access the internet, as many companies, nowadays, exclusively accept job applications via online processes operated by their Human Resources experts – even to the point of using online resources to set and confirm job interviews. Then there is the cost of a cell or other telephone device for job related communications, and an email account, so you can keep in touch digitally. Of course, prior to a job interview, many folks purchase new suits, shoes, have their hair styled; then there is cost of gas to get to the interview, or bus or plane or taxi fare, so on and so on.

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.............HOW TO CUT YOUR JOB SEARCH COSTS WAYS TO CUT YOUR JOB SEARCH COSTS

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The unledgered cost of a job search, once those related bills are associated firmly with the cost-of-finding-a-new-job, can be staggering, mounting even into thousands-of-dollars; and often times a deal-killer, for those who cannot muster the cost of the job-search resources listed above.

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If you find yourself in that circumstance, you may wonder to yourself the same thing that millions of other job-seekers have been thinking: How do you beat the high cost of a job search, and still get hired?

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It’s easy. Don’t spend the money; but still get hired promptly, or in a reasonable time-frame, anyway; whereby your efforts are guided by professional hiring counselors – as much or as little as you need. There is no ‘hard part,’ to this strategy. In fact, for each of the pesky job-search items identified for the tool-chest above, there is a professional counter-part available – at no charge – for those who decide to save some cash.

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Consider this: libraries are often forgotten as a valuable resource for organizing or implementing a professional job-search. A majority of U.S. libraries offer free access to computers pre-loaded with word-processing and spreadsheet software, that allows users to interface with the internet to harvest job-search intelligence, submit and follow-up with resumes, initiate job-search social networking contacts, and other related activities; with that in mind, maybe there is no need to spend the cash to upgrade your home-computer. And don’t forget the myriad business directories typically found in most libraries, which offer thousands of employer hiring contacts. And industry trade magazine, which carry job postings. And valuable certified training – yes, that’s correct – certified training. Many local libraries partner with non-profit organizations, such as SCORE and UNITED WAY and GOODWILL INDUSTRIES, to bring in training specialists who lead seminars and classes there on library premises.

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Another choice: Many national restaurants, hotels, motels, fast-food and retail outlets offer free WiFi, to attract consumers to their places of business. Most laptop computers can access those wireless systems. I’ve seen it happen with job candidates I know who used very inexpensive USB based digital phone devices to make-and-take job-search related long-distance phone calls, while being connected to free WiFi signals, such as those mentioned above. They were all successfully hired.

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Especially in retail, and in most workplace environments where an employee – manager or not – is going to handle or deposit cash or other valuable property, running a background check or credit-check is something that will likely occur. How do you beat the expense of those checks when you want to include such a valuable confirmation of trust with your resume? Let the employer pay, of course; that’s a no-brainer.

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But the smart job applicant, those willing to spend the money or find an equal, but free, alternative, have those checks done in advance and submit verifiable copies with their initial resume submission. Such initiative makes the difference between being noticed and going into the “we’ll think about it” pile. Department of Labor (2008) statistics confirm that of the small percent of applicants brought in for a job interview, the majority of those candidates customized their hiring documents and pre-supposed certain testing or qualifying questions and addressed those interests inside the resume submission documents.

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In the case of background-check data, when you want to confirm your current or past address or addresses, past phone numbers, arrest records or lack-thereof, traffic violations status or other minor interactions with local authorities, court cases, past employers – an array of such details are to be found for nearly every county in the United States. Digital conversion of hardcopy public records, court records, police records, city/county/township/school-district records, and other public organization records began decades ago. It’s out there. I often research the job candidates I personally recruit in the same manner. I go to the city/county where they live, find the county court online records, and see what I can find. I do the same thing for each city listed and associated with an employer on that candidate’s resume. The stories I could tell; those aside, I usually suggest to job candidates to run their own ‘vanity’ background-checks (as I did on them), archive copies of the searches, their respective URLs, etc… and print out, as verification, the resulting pages to confirm whatever it is they require for their job search. I’ve seen hundreds of hires occur based on such documents. Why trust them? Because anyone can verify the truth for themselves at any time, as it’s in the public record.

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These are just a few of the ways a serious job applicant can jazz up their job-search with some professional level pizz-zazz that often carries a hefty price-tag. There are other ways, too, for example, accessing a local job-counselor at the federally funded CareerOneStop centers, found in every state, and manned by trained job-search specialist, who can lead you to resources that help you get hired, as well as help you organize those customized job-resumes and job-references, and so on and so on.

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Best of luck in your job search.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Business Management Job Search Statistics

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 08 2010

JobNewsRADIO.com

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Finding Management & Business Channel Employers

........ Don't leave your job search results to chance.

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Learn which keywords drive your industry ... hiring habits, which parts of your job-experience are most in demand, and other important details about what motivates employers in your industry to extend a job offer, which job titles are deemed most urgent and why, and read the latest statistics on job-openings-verses-jobapplicants, as it relates to Management and Business hiring ....

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JOB SEARCH Magazine/Directory

Find And Meet 100's Of Hiring Experts In Your Region Of The US And In Your Specialty

Put your best foot forward with a free subscription

Research Your Industry

Search Jobs

With your resume and portfolio set, you'll be able to search and contact employers with one quick step!

Meet Hiring Agents

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Which keywords a jobseeker chooses to use in uncovering job posting in their field via major search engines, or other job post related websites, often determines how many, and which types of, industry jobs appear in the search results. Consider reviewing the various job title and industry specific keywords found to be the most used in your industry, as confirmed by the industry respected job-board operator Beyond.com.

Management Keyword Searches

1. Manager

2. Quality

3. Director

4. Business

5. Retail

6. President

7. Operations

8. Supervisor

9. MBA

10. Marketing

11. Project Manager

12. Purchasing

13. Vice President

14. CFO

OTHER KEYWORDS

Most Popular Keywords in Management & Executive

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Account Manager jobs

Business Development Manager jobs

Director jobsExecutive jobs

Marketing Manager jobs

Operations Management jobs

Product Manager jobs

Program Manager jobs

Project Manager jobs

Sales Manager jobs

Training Manager jobs

Other keywords » Other Keywords

Branch Manager jobs

Business Analyst jobs

Business Process Consultant jobs

Chief Executive Officer jobs

Education Consultant jobs

Engineering Manager jobs

Finance Manager jobs

General Manager jobs

Healthcare Consultant jobs

Human Resources Consulting jobs

Implementation Consultant jobs

It Consultant jobs

Management Consultant jobs

Market Research jobs

Marketing Consultant jobs

Risk Manager jobs

Strategic Planning jobs

Technical Manager jobs

Vice President jobs

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Search Management Positions

Administrative Services Manager

Advertising Manager

Assistant Director

Assistant Manager

Chief communications Officer

Chief Executive Office

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Information Officer

Chief Marketing Officer

Chief Operations Office

Chief Resources Officer

Chief Security Officer

Chief Technology Officer

Compensation & Benefits Manager

Construction manager

Director

Distribution manager

Engineering Manager

Executive Director

Executive Vice President

Financial Manager

Food Service Manager

Gaming Manager

General Counsel

General Manager

Government Service Executive

Human Resources Manager

Industrial Production Manager

Information Technology Manager

Management Trainee

Manager

Managing Director

Marketing manager

Medical & Health Services Manager

Partner

President

Principal

Program Manager

Public Relations Manager

Real Estate Manager

Regional/Multi-Unit Manager

Restaurant Management

Revenue Management

Sales Manager

Security Management

Senior Vice President

Supervisor

Training & Development Manager

Transportation manager

Vice President

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Review Management Trends

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Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Management sector. The graphs represent the change in volume of Management job and resume postings within the last several months.

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Sale and Business Management Jobs

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Research Personality Types

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Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles. What is your personality type?

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The top three personality types in the Management field are INTJ, INFJ, and ISTJ.

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INTJ (Introvert, Intuitive, Thinker, Judger)

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People of this type tend to be: autonomous, aloof, and intellectual; imaginative, innovative, and unique; critical, analytical, and logical; intellectually curious, driven to learn and increase their competence and knowledge; socially cautious and reserved; organized and definitive. The most important thing to INTJs is their independence and being able to live according to their own standards.

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Sales and Business Management Jobs

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Management Job Descriptions

Jobs in Management

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What Management career suits you best? Below is just one career to consider. If it's not for you, consider researching many more career posibilities in Management.

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Computer and Information Systems Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

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If you are looking for some information about a specific type of job or are just curious about other career paths, review the following positions to help choose the right one for you.

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Administrative Services Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate supportive services of an organization, such as recordkeeping, mail distribution, telephone operator/receptionist, and other office support services. May oversee facilities planning and maintenance and custodial operations.

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Advertising and Promotions Managers

Plan and direct advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or give-aways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.

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Chief Executives

Determine and formulate policies and provide the overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within the guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.

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Compensation and Benefits Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities and staff of an organization.

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Computer and Information Systems Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

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Construction Managers

Plan, direct, coordinate, or budget, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, and implementation.

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Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School

Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic, clerical, or auxiliary activities of public or private elementary or secondary level schools.

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Education Administrators, Postsecondary

Plan, direct, or coordinate research, instructional, student administration and services, and other educational activities at postsecondary institutions, including universities, colleges, and junior and community colleges.

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Engineering Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering or research and development in these fields.

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Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers

On a paid basis, manage farms, ranches, aquacultural operations, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, cotton gins, packing houses, or other agricultural establishments for employers. Carry out production, financial, and marketing decisions relating to the managed operations following guidelines from the owner. May contract tenant farmers or producers to carry out the day-to-day activities of the managed operation. May supervise planting, cultivating, harvesting, and marketing activities. May prepare cost, production, and other records. May perform physical work and operate machinery.

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Farmers and Ranchers

On an ownership or rental basis, operate farms, ranches, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, or other agricultural production establishments which produce crops, horticultural specialties, livestock, poultry, finfish, shellfish, or animal specialties. May plant, cultivate, harvest, perform post-harvest activities, and market crops and livestock; may hire, train, and supervise farm workers or supervise a farm labor contractor; may prepare cost, production, and other records. May maintain and operate machinery and perform physical work.

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Financial Managers

Plan, direct, and coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.

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Food Service Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages.

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Funeral Directors

Perform various tasks to arrange and direct funeral services, such as coordinating transportation of body to mortuary for embalming, interviewing family or other authorized person to arrange details, selecting pallbearers, procuring official for religious rites, and providing transportation for mourners.

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Gaming Managers

Plan, organize, direct, control, or coordinate gaming operations in a casino. Formulate gaming policies for their area of responsibility.

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General and Operations Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of companies or public and private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Includes owners and managers who head small business establishments whose duties are primarily managerial.

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Human Resources Managers

Plan, direct, and coordinate human resource management activities of an organization to maximize the strategic use of human resources and maintain functions such as employee compensation, recruitment, personnel policies, and regulatory compliance.

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Industrial Production Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.

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Legislators

Develop laws and statutes at the Federal, State, or local level.

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Lodging Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations.

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Management Analysts

Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplifications and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.

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Marketing Managers

Determine the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.

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Medical and Health Services Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate medicine and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

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Natural Sciences Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.

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Postmasters and Mail Superintendents

Direct and coordinate operational, administrative, management, and supportive services of a U.S. post office; or coordinate activities of workers engaged in postal and related work in assigned post office.

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Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties.

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Public Relations Managers

Plan and direct public relations programs designed to create and maintain a favorable public image for employer or client; or if engaged in fundraising, plan and direct activities to solicit and maintain funds for special projects and nonprofit organizations.

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Purchasing Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services.

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Sales Managers

Direct the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.

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Social and Community Service Managers

Plan, organize, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.

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Training and Development Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.

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Training and Development Specialists

Conduct training and development programs for employees.

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Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with governmental policies and regulations.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

NOVEMBER 2010 - Monster Employment Index

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 02 2010

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..............................Monster Employment Index

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Monster Employment Index Annual Growth Rate

Stable at 13% in November

Edges Down on Monthly Basis

New York, December 2, 2010

November 2010 Index Highlights:

•Tenth consecutive month of positive annual growth rate - stable at 13 percent in November

•Retail trade registers strong growth in November, suggesting positive outlook for consumer trends during the mid-November to January sales season

•Health care and social assistance records accelerated annual growth, with long-term trends most improved for healthcare support workers

•Management of companies and enterprises; and finance and insurance edge down on annual basis in November possibly indicating continued uncertainty in the banking and related fields

The Monster Employment Index is a monthly gauge of U.S. online job demand based on a real-time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large representative selection of corporate career Web sites and job boards, including Monster.com®.

Click here to get the full November MEI report.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

How NOT to Start Your Cover Letter

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Dec 01 2010

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JobNewsRADDIO.com

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................. How NOT ...

To Start Your Cover Letter

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Posted By: Jessica Holbrook In: Job Seeker - Cover Letters

http://www.jobnewsradio.4jobs.com/articles/how-not-to-start-your-cover-letter-4860-article.html

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..................... HOW YOUR COVER LETTER HELPS GET YOU HIRED

If you’re looking for some awesome cover letter advice ... on how *NOT* to start your cover letter (and some great examples of how you should be starting it) then read on!

On a weekly basis any hiring manager probably receives between 50 and … well, probably hundreds of resumes and cover letters. The key is to catch his or her attention from the start; and the best place to do that is in your cover letter. So I am going to tell you about the worst possible way to start your cover letter—and then give you some creative alternatives to use instead.

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MOST BORING INTRO LINE

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Here is the most boring intro line - because everyone uses it:

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Please accept my resume for consideration

of the (XYZ) position within your organization.

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What a snoozer! Everyone uses that line; let’s see … being like everyone else isn’t going to get you very far in your job search now is it? No, it’s not. So you need to be different. But not just different — you need to be unique and appear more valuable than the average joe. Let’s take a look at some more creative and attention grabbing opening lines:

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Administrative:

If you are spending too much time compiling tedious lists of general office duties and administrative tasks, then I have the solution for you. Try this: “My experiences in office administration and client services have equipped me with a multitude of skills including office management, business operations, and exemplary customer service. I am confident that my application of these and my many other skills would be an asset to your company.”

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Customer Service:

It’s twice as hard to attract a new customer as it is to maintain an existing one. Unfortunately, this fact is often overlooked by many businesses. So exploit this reality. Here’s an example of what you should write: “Delivering high-quality, responsive service is vital in (industry x). And that’s exactly what you’ll get when you hire me. As my resume indicates, I have worked in client services for more than (number) years, so you won’t have to incur great expense while training me.

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Nonprofit:

Try something like this: “In today’s challenging economic climate, many people will respond to your advertisement. Few will be interviewed. One will be hired.

However, of the many who will respond, few will be as qualified as I am, having in-depth experience in community and public outreach. No one else will bring my track record and the expertise I offer—expertise that equips me to immediately begin delivering results for you with maximum positive effect to your bottom line.

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General:

“Integrity. Innovation. Initiative.

If you have these qualities in mind for the position of (position title) then I suggest we meet to discuss the numerous qualifications I would bring to your organization. With my demonstrated track record of successfully directing pharmacy operations and introducing initiatives that directly impacted the bottom line, I am confident that I would be an excellent fit for the position at (company name).

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Of course, these are only a few sample introductions, and the remainder of your cover letter needs to be just as dynamic as the introduction. But nothing is more important than that initial first impression; and you are sure to win them over when you choose something unique, creative, and captivating.

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Comments Posted by: Kathie

While I see the point that Jessica is making in her article, I do have a problem with her suggestions. Although they might be eye catching, and definitely different from the most common, but to me they seem a little too confident - almost bragging which could also be offensive. What I am looking for is something in between them both.

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Posted by: Cover letter format

The following statement of yours is a gem and needs to be understood well by the cover letter writer: "But nothing is more important than that initial first impression."

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Posted by: Steven C.

Kathie, the level of confidence you should exhibit depends on the position. For example, sales reps want to appear extremely confident, executives want to appear extremely confident, when you apply for a job you want to give the impression you are confident that you are perfect for the job. How confident you want to show depends on the job or the audience you write too. For example, a trait law enforcement professionals share is a high degree of assertiveness and confidence, sometimes mistaken for arrogance. It's the nature of the job, so an applicant wants to show his confidence and assertiveness. Now, if you want to apply as a librarian, you still want to show confidence but you probably dp nit want to set the same tone as a person applying for a swat team position. The trick is to know the audience you are writing the cover letter to and set the tone accordingly. Some of the suggestions in the article will work in some situations. Others wont.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

Flirting in the Workplace

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 29 2010

SOURCE: Beyond.com

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Flirting in the Workplace

Some say office flirting is innocent and just a natural way to be nice to people and to enjoy the fun of being with others. However, what may be flirting to one person could be sexual harassment to another person. It’s a fine line and there are no universal laws about flirting in the workplace. Therefore, it is up to individuals to gauge what is appropriate and what is not and hopefully there is an office sexual harassment policy in place to help provide some guidance along the way.

To avoid overstepping boundaries in the workplace, here are a few simple tips employees should follow:

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• Observe other colleagues to discover the unspoken etiquette in your workplace.

• Limit public displays of affection.

• Treat everyone in the office the same way.

• Utilize group dynamics to avoid uncertainty.

• Maintain a wardrobe that projects a professional image.

• Strive to keep flattering remarks work-related rather than personal.

• Be aware of your office’s sexual harassment policy.

Reporting Bad Behavior

If an employee witnesses flirting or another situation in the workplace that they are uncomfortable with, it is best to speak up about it. One of the easiest ways to handle a situation is to discuss the matter directly with the involved colleagues. It is always best to approach them privately and let them know that their actions are not appropriate or appreciated. Explain why their behavior is disturbing or offensive and politely ask them to stop.

If the offended employee is not comfortable discussing the matter with the colleagues in person, they should take their complaint directly to their leader. It is best to document the situation and provide as much detail as possible. This approach is more complex, and therefore has harsher consequences, which often times involves getting the HR department involved to handle the situation. Usually the investigation ends with some form of discipline for the offending parties and could even result in dismissal from the company if the behavior continues. An office sexual harassment policy should include the necessary steps for reporting bad behavior.

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Preventative Measures Employers Can Take

It is important for companies to have a clear sexual harassment policy in place to help guide employees and allow them to make their best judgment. Employers should communicate this policy upon hiring each new employee and hold company meetings annually to reinforce the policy. Here are some steps companies should take into consideration regarding their sexual harassment policy:

•Research the law. Employers should consult their legal counsel to make sure that all state laws regarding sexual harassment are included in the policy.

•Inform employees about the policy. Once the policy is in writing, make sure all your employees know about it and make sure to review and update it from time to time.

•Educate employees. Offer sexual training seminars to further explain and reiterate the information in the sexual harassment policy. Allow employees to ask questions so they can better understand what is inappropriate and how to report it if a situation occurs.

•Follow the same rules. It is important that everyone follow the same rules, regardless of level or position in the company, otherwise the policy will not be taken seriously.

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Categories: Job Search Articles, Job Search Directory, Job Search Experts, JOB SEARCH Magazine, Job Search MP3s, Job Search Resources

FINDING GREAT SALES JOBS AND SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN A BAD ECONOMY

Posted by JobNewsRADIO
Nov 22 2010

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JobNewsRADIO.com

FINDING GREAT SALES JOBS AND SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN A BAD ECONOMY

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Sales Jobs &

Sales Management

Jobs - Recent Facts & Actions

USE THE INFORMATION BELOW TO HELP YOU FIND YOUR NEXT SALES JOB

OR SALES MANAGEMENT JOB

. SALES JOB HIRING REPORT

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Sales Keyword SALES JOB Searches

(Having a great set of proven, industry or vocation specific job search keywords can bring you valuable job resources you may otherwise never see; try adding your own city/state/region/job-title/etc. to the samples below)

1. Sales jobs

2. Sales Manager

3. Retail

4. Pharmaceutical

5. Pharmaceutical Sales

6. Cashier

7. Medical

8. Outside Sales

9. Software

10. Food

11. Inside Sales

12. Sales Representative

13. Account Manager

14. Demonstrator

15. Retail Sales

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Search HOT! Sales Job Hiring Trends ... Titles MOST HIRED Over The Last 90 Days

Advertising Sales Agent

Agricultural Sales Representative

Biotechnical Equipment Sales Representative

Cashier

Chemical Sales Representative

Computer Hardware Sales Representative

Counter Clerk

Demonstrator

Door-to-door Sales Worker

Financial Services Sales Agent

Food Service Sales Agent

Instrument Sales Representative

Insurance Sales Agent

Mechanical Equipment Sales Representative

Medical Sales Representative

Model

Non-retail Sales Supervisor

Parts Salesperson

Pharmaceutical Sales Representative

Product Promoter

Real Estate Sales Agent

Retail Sales Representative

Retail Sales Supervisor

Sales Engineer

Sales Manager

Software Sales Representative

Telecommunications Sales Agent

Telemarketer

Vendor

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Review Sales Job Sector Hiring Trends

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Review the statistical analysis below to get a feel for current trends in the Sales sector.

The graphs represent the change in volume of Sales job and resume postings within the last several months.

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SALES JOB HIRING TRENDS

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Research About SALES JOB Personality Types Employers Hire Most

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Many employers look for specific personality types to fit certain roles. What is your personality type?

The top three personality types in the Sales field are INTJ, INFJ, and ISTJ.

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INTJ (Introvert, Intuitive, Thinker, Judger)

SALES JOB HIRING SECRETS

People of this type tend to be: autonomous, aloof, and intellectual; imaginative, innovative, and unique; critical, analytical, and logical; intellectually curious, driven to learn and increase their competence and knowledge; socially cautious and reserved; organized and definitive. The most important thing to INTJs is their independence and being able to live according to their own standards.

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SALES JOB TITLES IN DEMAND AS COMPARED

TO 'Sales Job Sector Hiring Trends' Graph Above

Sales Job Descriptions

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Retail Salespersons

Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment.

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Jobs in Sales & Sales Management

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Advertising Sales Agents

Sell or solicit advertising, including graphic art, advertising space in publications, custom made signs, or TV and radio advertising time. May obtain leases for outdoor advertising sites or persuade retailer to use sales promotion display items.

Door-To-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers

Sell goods or services door-to-door or on the street.

Parts Salespersons

Sell spare and replacement parts and equipment in repair shop or parts store.

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Retail Salespersons

Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment.

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Sales Engineers

Sell business goods or services, the selling of which requires a technical background equivalent to a baccalaureate degree in engineering.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products

Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses or groups of individuals. Work requires substantial knowledge of items sold.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products

Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers where technical or scientific knowledge is required in such areas as biology, engineering, chemistry, and electronics, normally obtained from at least 2 years of post-secondary education.

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. FIND SALES JOBS OR SALES MANAGEMENT JOBS IN AREAS ACROSS THE USA

SALES JOB HIRING RESOURCES USA-WIDE

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WHERE TO FIND RELIABLE, COMPREHENSIVE, SALES JOB HIRING RESOURCES

WHERE TO FIND PROVEN SALES JOB SEARCH RESOURCES

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